Utilization of complement receptors in immune cell–microbe interaction

Szilvia Lukácsi, Bernadett Mácsik-Valent, Zsuzsa Nagy-Baló, Kristóf G. Kovács, Kristóf Kliment, Zsuzsa Bajtay, Anna Erdei

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The complement system is a major humoral component of immunity and is essential for the fast elimination of pathogens invading the body. In addition to its indispensable role in innate immunity, the complement system is also involved in pathogen clearance during the effector phase of adaptive immunity. The fastest way of killing the invader is lysis by the membrane attack complex, which is formed by the terminal components of the complement cascade. Not all pathogens are lysed however and, if opsonized by a variety of molecules, they undergo phagocytosis and disposal inside immune cells. The most important complement-derived opsonins are C1q, the first component of the classical pathway, MBL, the initiator of the lectin pathway and C3-derived activation fragments, including C3b, iC3b and C3d, which all serve as ligands for their corresponding receptors. In this review, we discuss how complement receptors are utilized by various immune cells to tackle invading microbes, or by pathogens to evade host response.

Original languageEnglish
JournalFEBS letters
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

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Keywords

  • complement activation
  • complement receptors
  • complement-derived ligands
  • pathogen clearance
  • pathogen escape

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Structural Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Lukácsi, S., Mácsik-Valent, B., Nagy-Baló, Z., Kovács, K. G., Kliment, K., Bajtay, Z., & Erdei, A. (Accepted/In press). Utilization of complement receptors in immune cell–microbe interaction. FEBS letters. https://doi.org/10.1002/1873-3468.13743