Uses and misuses of progress curve analysis in enzyme kinetics

Natalia Nikolova, Kiril Tenekedjiev, Krasimir Kolev

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Progress curve analysis is a convenient tool for the characterization of enzyme action: a single reaction mixture provides multiple experimental measured points for continuously varying amounts of substrates and products with exactly the same enzyme and modulator concentrations. The determination of kinetic parameters from the progress curves, however, requires complex mathematical evaluation of the time-course data. Some freely available programs (e.g. FITSIM, DYNAFIT) are widely applied to fit kinetic parameters to user-defined enzymatic mechanisms, but users often overlook the stringent requirements of the analytic procedures for appropriate design of the input experiments. Flaws in the experimental setup result in unreliable parameters with consequent misinterpretation of the biological phenomenon under study. The present commentary suggests some helpful mathematical tools to improve the analytic procedure in order to diagnose major errors in concept and design of kinetic experiments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)345-350
Number of pages6
JournalCentral European Journal of Biology
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2008

Fingerprint

Enzyme kinetics
enzyme kinetics
Kinetic parameters
kinetics
Enzymes
Modulators
Biological Phenomena
Experiments
enzymes
Defects
Substrates

Keywords

  • Continuous enzyme assay
  • Data analysis
  • Monte Carlo simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Uses and misuses of progress curve analysis in enzyme kinetics. / Nikolova, Natalia; Tenekedjiev, Kiril; Kolev, Krasimir.

In: Central European Journal of Biology, Vol. 3, No. 4, 12.2008, p. 345-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nikolova, Natalia ; Tenekedjiev, Kiril ; Kolev, Krasimir. / Uses and misuses of progress curve analysis in enzyme kinetics. In: Central European Journal of Biology. 2008 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 345-350.
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