Use of electroconvulsive therapy in the Baltic states

Margus Lõokene, Aigars Kisuro, Valentinas Mačiulis, Valdas Banaitis, Gabor S. Ungvari, G. Gazdag

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. While the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been investigated worldwide, nothing is known about its use in the Baltic states. The purpose of this study was thus to explore ECT practice in the three Baltic countries. Methods. A 21-item, semi-structured questionnaire was sent out to all psychiatric inpatient settings that provided ECT in 2010. Results. In Lithuania, four services provided ECT in 2010. Only modified ECT with anaesthesia and muscle relaxation is performed in the country. In 2010, approximately 120 patients received ECT, i.e., 0.375 patients/10,000 population. Only two centres offer ECT in Latvia. The first centre treated only three patients with ECT in 2010, while the second centre six patients. In both centres outdated Soviet machines are used. The main indication for ECT was severe, malignant catatonia. ECT is practiced in five psychiatric facilities in Estonia. In 2010, it was used in the treatment of 362 patients (17% women) nationwide, i.e., 2.78 patients/10,000 population. Only a senior psychiatrist may indicate ECT in Estonia and pregnancy is no contraindication. In 2010, the main indication for ECT was schizophrenia (47.8%). Conclusions. This 2010 survey revealed significant differences in the use and availability of ECT between the Baltic countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-424
Number of pages6
JournalWorld Journal of Biological Psychiatry
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Baltic States
Electroconvulsive Therapy
Estonia
Psychiatry
Latvia
Catatonia
Lithuania
Muscle Relaxation

Keywords

  • Affective disorders
  • Baltic states
  • Electroconvulsive therapy practice
  • Schizophrenia
  • Suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Use of electroconvulsive therapy in the Baltic states. / Lõokene, Margus; Kisuro, Aigars; Mačiulis, Valentinas; Banaitis, Valdas; Ungvari, Gabor S.; Gazdag, G.

In: World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 15, No. 5, 2014, p. 419-424.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lõokene, M, Kisuro, A, Mačiulis, V, Banaitis, V, Ungvari, GS & Gazdag, G 2014, 'Use of electroconvulsive therapy in the Baltic states', World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 419-424. https://doi.org/10.3109/15622975.2013.866692
Lõokene, Margus ; Kisuro, Aigars ; Mačiulis, Valentinas ; Banaitis, Valdas ; Ungvari, Gabor S. ; Gazdag, G. / Use of electroconvulsive therapy in the Baltic states. In: World Journal of Biological Psychiatry. 2014 ; Vol. 15, No. 5. pp. 419-424.
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