Ureteral motility

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pyeloureteral function is to transport urine from the kidneys into the ureter toward the urinary bladder for storage until micturition. A set of mechanisms collaborates to achieve this purpose: the basic process regulating ureteral peristalsis is myogenic, initiated by active pacemaker cells located in the renal pelvis. Great emphasis has been given to hydrodynamic factors, such as urine flow rate in determining the size and pattern of urine boluses which, in turn, affect the mechanical aspects of peristaltic rhythm, rate, amplitude, and baseline pressure. Neurogenic contribution is thought to be limited to play a modulatory role in ureteral peristalsis. The myogenic theory of ureteral peristalsis can be traced back to Engelmann (1) who was able to localize the peristaltic pressure wave's origin in the renal pelvis and suggested that the ureteral contraction impulse passes from one ureteral cell to another, the whole ureter working as a functional syncitium. Recent studies of ureteral biomechanics, smooth muscle cell electrophysiology, membrane ionic currents, cytoskeletal components and pharmacophysiology much improved our understanding of the mechanism of how the urine bolus is propelled, how this process is disturbed in pathological states, and what could be done to improve it.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)407-426
Number of pages20
JournalActa Physiologica Hungarica
Volume96
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2009

Fingerprint

Peristalsis
Urine
Kidney Pelvis
Ureter
Pressure
Urination
Electrophysiology
Hydrodynamics
Biomechanical Phenomena
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Urinary Bladder
Cell Membrane
Kidney

Keywords

  • Action potential
  • Pacemaker
  • Peristalsis
  • Ureter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Ureteral motility. / Osman, F.; Romics, I.; Nyírády, P.; Monos, E.; Nádasy, G.

In: Acta Physiologica Hungarica, Vol. 96, No. 4, 01.12.2009, p. 407-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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