Update: Inflammatory, angiogenic, and homeostatic chemokines and their receptors

Z. Szekanecz, Alisa Erika Koch

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Numerous aspects of chemokines and chemokine receptors in rheumatic diseases have been discussed recently.2 Here, we will give an update on recent developments in chemokine research. Regarding the recent functional classification described above, we will primarily focus on inflammatory and angiogenic/angiostatic chemokines and their receptors, as these molecules are involved in the pathogenesis of arthritis. Among inflammatory rheumatic diseases, we picked rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic inflammatory and destructive articular disease as a prototype, as the majority of chemokine studies have been performed in this disease and its animal models. 1-6 First, we will give a brief overview of the chemokine and chemokine receptor subsets. Those inflammatory, angiogenic/angiostatic, and homeostatic chemokines and chemokine receptors will be discussed in more detail, which may be important in the pathogenesis of RA and thus may become targets for anti-chemokine therapy. As the last few years have seen a rapid development of studies on chemokine and chemokine receptor targeting, we will summarize data obtained in RA and in animal models of arthritis. Based on the great number of recent studies, it is very likely that the next few years will bring several new preclinical and clinical trials in this field.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationContemporary Targeted Therapies in Rheumatology
PublisherCRC Press
Pages265-284
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)9780203694145
ISBN (Print)9781841844848
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2007

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Chemokine Receptors
Chemokines
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rheumatic Diseases
Arthritis
Animal Disease Models
Animal Models
Joints
Clinical Trials
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Szekanecz, Z., & Koch, A. E. (2007). Update: Inflammatory, angiogenic, and homeostatic chemokines and their receptors. In Contemporary Targeted Therapies in Rheumatology (pp. 265-284). CRC Press.

Update : Inflammatory, angiogenic, and homeostatic chemokines and their receptors. / Szekanecz, Z.; Koch, Alisa Erika.

Contemporary Targeted Therapies in Rheumatology. CRC Press, 2007. p. 265-284.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Szekanecz, Z & Koch, AE 2007, Update: Inflammatory, angiogenic, and homeostatic chemokines and their receptors. in Contemporary Targeted Therapies in Rheumatology. CRC Press, pp. 265-284.
Szekanecz Z, Koch AE. Update: Inflammatory, angiogenic, and homeostatic chemokines and their receptors. In Contemporary Targeted Therapies in Rheumatology. CRC Press. 2007. p. 265-284
Szekanecz, Z. ; Koch, Alisa Erika. / Update : Inflammatory, angiogenic, and homeostatic chemokines and their receptors. Contemporary Targeted Therapies in Rheumatology. CRC Press, 2007. pp. 265-284
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