Unravelling the relationships between life history, behaviour and condition under the pace-of-life syndromes hypothesis using long-term data from a wild bird

Mónika Jablonszky, Eszter Szász, Katalin Krenhardt, Gábor Markó, G. Hegyi, Márton Herényi, Miklós Laczi, Gergely Nagy, B. Rosivall, E. Szöllősi, J. Török, László Zsolt Garamszegi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract: The hypothesis of pace-of-life syndromes (POLS) predicts relationships between traits including life history traits and risk-taking behaviour that can be mediated by the trade-off between current and future reproductive value. However, alternative causal mechanisms may also generate covariance among these traits without trade-offs. We investigated the relationships between survival to the next year, current reproductive investment and risk-taking behaviour (flight initiation distance) in male collared flycatchers, Ficedula albicollis, using long-term data. We used structural equation modelling (SEM) to uncover whether the associations among traits are mediated by a common latent factor that determines how individuals balance the trade-off between current and future reproductive value. As trade-offs could be concealed when there are differences in resource acquisition between individuals, we also included potential causes of these differences, body mass and body size, in the analysis. We found that risk-taking behaviour was positively related to reproductive investment and negatively to survival to the next year as could be predicted if investment into a risky behaviour is traded against future prospects. However, the most supported SEM model also suggested that survival to the next year was positively related to current reproductive investment, contrary to predictions of a hypothesis based on trade-off. These results remained qualitatively similar when controlling for body condition. In conclusion, we only could derive partial support for the POLS hypothesis. We suggest that aspects of individual quality, and not only trade-offs, should also be considered when interpreting the relationships between life history and behavioural traits. Significance statement: We investigated the association between two life history components (survival to the next year and current reproductive effort) and risk-taking behaviour, relying on long-term records from a passerine bird, to investigate the predictions of the pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis. Using structural equation modelling, we found support for a causal model that implies that risk-taking negatively affects survival to the next year and that survival to the next year and current reproductive effort are strongly and positively associated. Controlling for the effect of body condition did not fundamentally change these relationships. We could not find conclusive evidence for the investigated traits being mediated by a common underlying factor, as generally predicted by the POLS hypothesis. However, the sign of the relationship between risk-taking behaviour and survival to the next year was as predicted by the POLS hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number52
JournalBehavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Volume72
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2018

Keywords

  • Behavioural syndrome
  • FID
  • Fitness
  • Model selection
  • Passerine
  • Personality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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