Uniformly curated signaling pathways reveal tissue-specific cross-talks and support drug target discovery

T. Korcsmáros, I. Farkas, M. Szalay, Petra Rovó, Dávid Fazekas, Zoltán Spiró, Csaba Bode, Katalin Lenti, T. Vellai, P. Csermely

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Motivation: Signaling pathways control a large variety of cellular processes. However, currently, even within the same database signaling pathways are often curated at different levels of detail. This makes comparative and cross-talk analyses difficult. Results: We present SignaLink, a database containing eight major signaling pathways from Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and humans. Based on 170 review and ~800 research articles, we have compiled pathways with semi-automatic searches and uniform, well-documented curation rules. We found that in humans any two of the eight pathways can cross-talk. We quantified the possible tissue-and cancer-specific activity of cross-talks and found pathway-specific expression profiles. In addition, we identified 327 proteins relevant for drug target discovery. Conclusions: We provide a novel resource for comparative and cross-talk analyses of signaling pathways. The identified multi-pathway and tissue-specific cross-talks contribute to the understanding of the signaling complexity in health and disease, and underscore its importance in network-based drug target selection.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberbtq310
Pages (from-to)2042-2050
Number of pages9
JournalBioinformatics
Volume26
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 11 2010

Fingerprint

Signaling Pathways
Crosstalk
Drug Discovery
Drugs
Databases
Tissue
Pathway
Target
Caenorhabditis elegans
Drosophila melanogaster
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Health
Research
Drosophilidae
Neoplasms
Proteins
Cancer
Protein
Resources

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computational Mathematics
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Uniformly curated signaling pathways reveal tissue-specific cross-talks and support drug target discovery. / Korcsmáros, T.; Farkas, I.; Szalay, M.; Rovó, Petra; Fazekas, Dávid; Spiró, Zoltán; Bode, Csaba; Lenti, Katalin; Vellai, T.; Csermely, P.

In: Bioinformatics, Vol. 26, No. 16, btq310, 11.06.2010, p. 2042-2050.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Korcsmáros, T. ; Farkas, I. ; Szalay, M. ; Rovó, Petra ; Fazekas, Dávid ; Spiró, Zoltán ; Bode, Csaba ; Lenti, Katalin ; Vellai, T. ; Csermely, P. / Uniformly curated signaling pathways reveal tissue-specific cross-talks and support drug target discovery. In: Bioinformatics. 2010 ; Vol. 26, No. 16. pp. 2042-2050.
@article{bb0c2915afed4edd81350a956711fe45,
title = "Uniformly curated signaling pathways reveal tissue-specific cross-talks and support drug target discovery",
abstract = "Motivation: Signaling pathways control a large variety of cellular processes. However, currently, even within the same database signaling pathways are often curated at different levels of detail. This makes comparative and cross-talk analyses difficult. Results: We present SignaLink, a database containing eight major signaling pathways from Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and humans. Based on 170 review and ~800 research articles, we have compiled pathways with semi-automatic searches and uniform, well-documented curation rules. We found that in humans any two of the eight pathways can cross-talk. We quantified the possible tissue-and cancer-specific activity of cross-talks and found pathway-specific expression profiles. In addition, we identified 327 proteins relevant for drug target discovery. Conclusions: We provide a novel resource for comparative and cross-talk analyses of signaling pathways. The identified multi-pathway and tissue-specific cross-talks contribute to the understanding of the signaling complexity in health and disease, and underscore its importance in network-based drug target selection.",
author = "T. Korcsm{\'a}ros and I. Farkas and M. Szalay and Petra Rov{\'o} and D{\'a}vid Fazekas and Zolt{\'a}n Spir{\'o} and Csaba Bode and Katalin Lenti and T. Vellai and P. Csermely",
year = "2010",
month = "6",
day = "11",
doi = "10.1093/bioinformatics/btq310",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "2042--2050",
journal = "Bioinformatics",
issn = "1367-4803",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "16",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Uniformly curated signaling pathways reveal tissue-specific cross-talks and support drug target discovery

AU - Korcsmáros, T.

AU - Farkas, I.

AU - Szalay, M.

AU - Rovó, Petra

AU - Fazekas, Dávid

AU - Spiró, Zoltán

AU - Bode, Csaba

AU - Lenti, Katalin

AU - Vellai, T.

AU - Csermely, P.

PY - 2010/6/11

Y1 - 2010/6/11

N2 - Motivation: Signaling pathways control a large variety of cellular processes. However, currently, even within the same database signaling pathways are often curated at different levels of detail. This makes comparative and cross-talk analyses difficult. Results: We present SignaLink, a database containing eight major signaling pathways from Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and humans. Based on 170 review and ~800 research articles, we have compiled pathways with semi-automatic searches and uniform, well-documented curation rules. We found that in humans any two of the eight pathways can cross-talk. We quantified the possible tissue-and cancer-specific activity of cross-talks and found pathway-specific expression profiles. In addition, we identified 327 proteins relevant for drug target discovery. Conclusions: We provide a novel resource for comparative and cross-talk analyses of signaling pathways. The identified multi-pathway and tissue-specific cross-talks contribute to the understanding of the signaling complexity in health and disease, and underscore its importance in network-based drug target selection.

AB - Motivation: Signaling pathways control a large variety of cellular processes. However, currently, even within the same database signaling pathways are often curated at different levels of detail. This makes comparative and cross-talk analyses difficult. Results: We present SignaLink, a database containing eight major signaling pathways from Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and humans. Based on 170 review and ~800 research articles, we have compiled pathways with semi-automatic searches and uniform, well-documented curation rules. We found that in humans any two of the eight pathways can cross-talk. We quantified the possible tissue-and cancer-specific activity of cross-talks and found pathway-specific expression profiles. In addition, we identified 327 proteins relevant for drug target discovery. Conclusions: We provide a novel resource for comparative and cross-talk analyses of signaling pathways. The identified multi-pathway and tissue-specific cross-talks contribute to the understanding of the signaling complexity in health and disease, and underscore its importance in network-based drug target selection.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77955444349&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77955444349&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/bioinformatics/btq310

DO - 10.1093/bioinformatics/btq310

M3 - Article

C2 - 20542890

AN - SCOPUS:77955444349

VL - 26

SP - 2042

EP - 2050

JO - Bioinformatics

JF - Bioinformatics

SN - 1367-4803

IS - 16

M1 - btq310

ER -