Under the changing climate: How shifting geographic distributions and sexual selection shape parasite diversification

L. Rózsa, Piotr Tryjanowski, Zoltán Vas

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parasites live in an intimately close relationship with their hosts, either inserted within their anatomic structures or securely attached onto their surface. Therefore, we expect biotic effects – such as host individual, population and community characters – to influence all features of parasite communities, including richness (Poulin, 2008). In contrast, physical features of the abiotic environment, such as temperature, humidity, etc. are not usually expected to influence communities of parasites directly. The direct influence of the physical environment may be even less pronounced in terrestrial than in aquatic habitats because the terrestrial environment is less habitable for the free-living stages of parasites. Not surprisingly, major textbooks on parasite ecology rarely discuss the effects of abiotic environmental factors on terrestrial parasite assemblages (but see Bordes et al., 2010).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationParasite Diversity and Diversification: Evolutionary Ecology Meets Phylogenetics
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages58-76
Number of pages19
ISBN (Print)9781139794749, 9781107037656
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Rózsa, L., Tryjanowski, P., & Vas, Z. (2015). Under the changing climate: How shifting geographic distributions and sexual selection shape parasite diversification. In Parasite Diversity and Diversification: Evolutionary Ecology Meets Phylogenetics (pp. 58-76). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139794749.006