Uncertainty of the sample size reduction step in pesticide residue analysis of large-sized crops

P. Yolci Omeroglu, A. Ámbrus, D. Boyacioglu, E. Solymosne Majzik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To estimate the uncertainty of the sample size reduction step, each unit in laboratory samples of papaya and cucumber was cut into four segments in longitudinal directions and two opposite segments were selected for further homogenisation while the other two were discarded. Jackfruit was cut into six segments in longitudinal directions, and all segments were kept for further analysis. To determine the pesticide residue concentrations in each segment, they were individually homogenised and analysed by chromatographic methods. One segment from each unit of the laboratory sample was drawn randomly to obtain 50 theoretical sub-samples with an MS Office Excel macro. The residue concentrations in a sub-sample were calculated from the weight of segments and the corresponding residue concentration. The coefficient of variation calculated from the residue concentrations of 50 sub-samples gave the relative uncertainty resulting from the sample size reduction step. The sample size reduction step, which is performed by selecting one longitudinal segment from each unit of the laboratory sample, resulted in relative uncertainties of 17% and 21% for field-treated jackfruits and cucumber, respectively, and 7% for post-harvest treated papaya. The results demonstrated that sample size reduction is an inevitable source of uncertainty in pesticide residue analysis of large-sized crops. The post-harvest treatment resulted in a lower variability because the dipping process leads to a more uniform residue concentration on the surface of the crops than does the foliar application of pesticides.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-126
Number of pages11
JournalFood Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Pesticide Residues
pesticide residues
Sample Size
Crops
Uncertainty
uncertainty
Artocarpus
Carica
Cucumis sativus
crops
sampling
jackfruits
Pesticides
Macros
papayas
cucumbers
Weights and Measures
postharvest treatment
dipping
foliar application

Keywords

  • large size crops
  • pesticide residues
  • sample size reduction
  • uncertainty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Toxicology
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Uncertainty of the sample size reduction step in pesticide residue analysis of large-sized crops. / Omeroglu, P. Yolci; Ámbrus, A.; Boyacioglu, D.; Majzik, E. Solymosne.

In: Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 116-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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