Ultrafast sensing of photoconductivity decay using microwave resonators

B. Gyüre-Garami, B. Blum, O. Sági, A. Bojtor, S. Kollarics, G. Csosz, B. G. Márkus, J. Volk, F. Simon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Microwave reflectance probed photoconductivity (or μ-PCD) measurement represents a contactless method to determine the amount and lifetime of light-induced charge carriers in semiconductors. Major drawbacks of the method include a difficult separation of reflectance due to dielectric and conduction effects and that the μ-PCD signal is prohibitively weak for highly conducting samples. Both of these limitations could be tackled with the use of microwave resonators due to the well-known sensitivity of resonator parameters to minute changes in the material properties combined with a null measurement. A general misconception is that time resolution of resonator measurements is limited beyond their bandwidth by the readout electronics response time. While it is true for conventional resonator measurements, such as those employing a frequency sweep, we present a time-resolved resonator parameter readout method which overcomes these limitations and allows measurement of complex material parameters and to enhance μ-PCD signals with the ultimate time resolution limit being the resonator time constant. This is achieved by detecting the transient response of microwave resonators on the time scale of a few 100 ns during the μ-PCD decay signal. The method employs a high-stability oscillator working with a fixed frequency, which results in a stable and highly accurate measurement.

Original languageEnglish
Article number235702
JournalJournal of Applied Physics
Volume126
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 21 2019

Fingerprint

photoconductivity
resonators
microwaves
decay
readout
reflectance
conduction
sweep frequency
transient response
time constant
charge carriers
oscillators
bandwidth
life (durability)
sensitivity
electronics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Gyüre-Garami, B., Blum, B., Sági, O., Bojtor, A., Kollarics, S., Csosz, G., ... Simon, F. (2019). Ultrafast sensing of photoconductivity decay using microwave resonators. Journal of Applied Physics, 126(23), [235702]. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5129597

Ultrafast sensing of photoconductivity decay using microwave resonators. / Gyüre-Garami, B.; Blum, B.; Sági, O.; Bojtor, A.; Kollarics, S.; Csosz, G.; Márkus, B. G.; Volk, J.; Simon, F.

In: Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 126, No. 23, 235702, 21.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gyüre-Garami, B, Blum, B, Sági, O, Bojtor, A, Kollarics, S, Csosz, G, Márkus, BG, Volk, J & Simon, F 2019, 'Ultrafast sensing of photoconductivity decay using microwave resonators', Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 126, no. 23, 235702. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5129597
Gyüre-Garami B, Blum B, Sági O, Bojtor A, Kollarics S, Csosz G et al. Ultrafast sensing of photoconductivity decay using microwave resonators. Journal of Applied Physics. 2019 Dec 21;126(23). 235702. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5129597
Gyüre-Garami, B. ; Blum, B. ; Sági, O. ; Bojtor, A. ; Kollarics, S. ; Csosz, G. ; Márkus, B. G. ; Volk, J. ; Simon, F. / Ultrafast sensing of photoconductivity decay using microwave resonators. In: Journal of Applied Physics. 2019 ; Vol. 126, No. 23.
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