Two-Year Agility Maintenance Training Slows the Progression of Parkinsonian Symptoms

József Tollár, Ferenc Nagy, N. Kovács, Tibor Hortobágyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition and it is unclear if long-term nonpharmaceutical interventions can slow the progression of motor and nonmotor symptoms and lower drug dose. Methods In a randomized trial, after an initial 3-wk-long, 15-session supervised high-intensity sensorimotor agility exercise (E) program designed to improve postural instability, the exercise+maintenance (E + M, n = 19) group continued to exercise three times per week for 2 yr, whereas E (n = 16), and the no exercise and no maintenance control (C, n = 20) continued habitual living. Eight outcomes were measured before and after the 3-wk initial exercise program and then at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months in all patients. Results The group-time interactions (all P < 0.005) revealed robust and favorable effects of the initial 3-wk agility program on all six nonmotor (e.g., primary outcome Movement Disorder Society Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, Motor Experiences of Daily Living, 7 points; EuroQoL, 9 points) and on each of the two motor outcomes (timed up and go test: 6 s; posturography: up to 7 mm improvements in center of pressure path). E + M maintained but did not further improve the benefits produced by the initial 3-wk program. In E, the favorable effects of the 3-wk agility program lasted for 3 to 12 months. In C, patients declined steadily in all outcomes over 2 yr. By year 2, Leva-dopa equivalents increased by 99.4 mg·d-1 (time main effect, P = 0.008). Conclusions A high-intensity sensorimotor agility program with but not without a 2-yr maintenance program slowed the progression of parkinsonian symptoms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)237-245
Number of pages9
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2019

Fingerprint

Maintenance
Exercise
Parkinson Disease
Dihydroxyphenylalanine
Pressure
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • BALANCE TRAINING
  • FOLLOW UP
  • POSTURE
  • QUALITY OF LIFE
  • SENSORIMOTOR TRAINING

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Two-Year Agility Maintenance Training Slows the Progression of Parkinsonian Symptoms. / Tollár, József; Nagy, Ferenc; Kovács, N.; Hortobágyi, Tibor.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 51, No. 2, 01.02.2019, p. 237-245.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tollár, József ; Nagy, Ferenc ; Kovács, N. ; Hortobágyi, Tibor. / Two-Year Agility Maintenance Training Slows the Progression of Parkinsonian Symptoms. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2019 ; Vol. 51, No. 2. pp. 237-245.
@article{e7ddea16e96d4fc7bba0fa4ac5360582,
title = "Two-Year Agility Maintenance Training Slows the Progression of Parkinsonian Symptoms",
abstract = "Introduction Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition and it is unclear if long-term nonpharmaceutical interventions can slow the progression of motor and nonmotor symptoms and lower drug dose. Methods In a randomized trial, after an initial 3-wk-long, 15-session supervised high-intensity sensorimotor agility exercise (E) program designed to improve postural instability, the exercise+maintenance (E + M, n = 19) group continued to exercise three times per week for 2 yr, whereas E (n = 16), and the no exercise and no maintenance control (C, n = 20) continued habitual living. Eight outcomes were measured before and after the 3-wk initial exercise program and then at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months in all patients. Results The group-time interactions (all P < 0.005) revealed robust and favorable effects of the initial 3-wk agility program on all six nonmotor (e.g., primary outcome Movement Disorder Society Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, Motor Experiences of Daily Living, 7 points; EuroQoL, 9 points) and on each of the two motor outcomes (timed up and go test: 6 s; posturography: up to 7 mm improvements in center of pressure path). E + M maintained but did not further improve the benefits produced by the initial 3-wk program. In E, the favorable effects of the 3-wk agility program lasted for 3 to 12 months. In C, patients declined steadily in all outcomes over 2 yr. By year 2, Leva-dopa equivalents increased by 99.4 mg·d-1 (time main effect, P = 0.008). Conclusions A high-intensity sensorimotor agility program with but not without a 2-yr maintenance program slowed the progression of parkinsonian symptoms.",
keywords = "BALANCE TRAINING, FOLLOW UP, POSTURE, QUALITY OF LIFE, SENSORIMOTOR TRAINING",
author = "J{\'o}zsef Toll{\'a}r and Ferenc Nagy and N. Kov{\'a}cs and Tibor Hortob{\'a}gyi",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1249/MSS.0000000000001793",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "237--245",
journal = "Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise",
issn = "0195-9131",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Two-Year Agility Maintenance Training Slows the Progression of Parkinsonian Symptoms

AU - Tollár, József

AU - Nagy, Ferenc

AU - Kovács, N.

AU - Hortobágyi, Tibor

PY - 2019/2/1

Y1 - 2019/2/1

N2 - Introduction Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition and it is unclear if long-term nonpharmaceutical interventions can slow the progression of motor and nonmotor symptoms and lower drug dose. Methods In a randomized trial, after an initial 3-wk-long, 15-session supervised high-intensity sensorimotor agility exercise (E) program designed to improve postural instability, the exercise+maintenance (E + M, n = 19) group continued to exercise three times per week for 2 yr, whereas E (n = 16), and the no exercise and no maintenance control (C, n = 20) continued habitual living. Eight outcomes were measured before and after the 3-wk initial exercise program and then at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months in all patients. Results The group-time interactions (all P < 0.005) revealed robust and favorable effects of the initial 3-wk agility program on all six nonmotor (e.g., primary outcome Movement Disorder Society Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, Motor Experiences of Daily Living, 7 points; EuroQoL, 9 points) and on each of the two motor outcomes (timed up and go test: 6 s; posturography: up to 7 mm improvements in center of pressure path). E + M maintained but did not further improve the benefits produced by the initial 3-wk program. In E, the favorable effects of the 3-wk agility program lasted for 3 to 12 months. In C, patients declined steadily in all outcomes over 2 yr. By year 2, Leva-dopa equivalents increased by 99.4 mg·d-1 (time main effect, P = 0.008). Conclusions A high-intensity sensorimotor agility program with but not without a 2-yr maintenance program slowed the progression of parkinsonian symptoms.

AB - Introduction Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition and it is unclear if long-term nonpharmaceutical interventions can slow the progression of motor and nonmotor symptoms and lower drug dose. Methods In a randomized trial, after an initial 3-wk-long, 15-session supervised high-intensity sensorimotor agility exercise (E) program designed to improve postural instability, the exercise+maintenance (E + M, n = 19) group continued to exercise three times per week for 2 yr, whereas E (n = 16), and the no exercise and no maintenance control (C, n = 20) continued habitual living. Eight outcomes were measured before and after the 3-wk initial exercise program and then at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months in all patients. Results The group-time interactions (all P < 0.005) revealed robust and favorable effects of the initial 3-wk agility program on all six nonmotor (e.g., primary outcome Movement Disorder Society Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, Motor Experiences of Daily Living, 7 points; EuroQoL, 9 points) and on each of the two motor outcomes (timed up and go test: 6 s; posturography: up to 7 mm improvements in center of pressure path). E + M maintained but did not further improve the benefits produced by the initial 3-wk program. In E, the favorable effects of the 3-wk agility program lasted for 3 to 12 months. In C, patients declined steadily in all outcomes over 2 yr. By year 2, Leva-dopa equivalents increased by 99.4 mg·d-1 (time main effect, P = 0.008). Conclusions A high-intensity sensorimotor agility program with but not without a 2-yr maintenance program slowed the progression of parkinsonian symptoms.

KW - BALANCE TRAINING

KW - FOLLOW UP

KW - POSTURE

KW - QUALITY OF LIFE

KW - SENSORIMOTOR TRAINING

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060032234&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85060032234&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001793

DO - 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001793

M3 - Article

VL - 51

SP - 237

EP - 245

JO - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

JF - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

SN - 0195-9131

IS - 2

ER -