TRP channels and pruritus

Balázs I. Tóth, T. Bíró

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Itch (pruritus) is one of the most often seen sensory phenomena in clinical practice. Recent neurophysiological findings proposed the existence of a novel pruriceptive system which includes a multitude of pruritogenic (itch-inducing) peripheral mediators, itch-selective pruriceptors, sensory afferent networks, spinal cord neurons, and certain central nervous system regions. In this review, we first introduce major features of the pruriceptive system. We then focus on defining the roles of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels in skin-coupled itch and provide compelling evidence that certain thermosensitive TRP channels (especially TRPV1, TRPV3, TRPV4, and TRPA1) are indeed key players in pruritus pathogenesis. Finally, we propose TRP-centered future experimental directions towards the therapeutic targeting of TRP channels in the clinical management of itch.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)62-80
Number of pages19
JournalOpen Pain Journal
Volume6
Issue numberSPEC.ISSUE.1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Transient Receptor Potential Channels
Pruritus
Ion Channels
Spinal Cord
Central Nervous System
Neurons
Skin
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Pruritogenic
  • Pruritus
  • Thermosensitive
  • TRP channels

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

TRP channels and pruritus. / Tóth, Balázs I.; Bíró, T.

In: Open Pain Journal, Vol. 6, No. SPEC.ISSUE.1, 2013, p. 62-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tóth, Balázs I. ; Bíró, T. / TRP channels and pruritus. In: Open Pain Journal. 2013 ; Vol. 6, No. SPEC.ISSUE.1. pp. 62-80.
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