Tree plantations are hot-spots of plant invasion in a landscape with heterogeneous land-use

Anikó Csecserits, Z. Botta-Dukát, György Kröel-Dulay, Barbara Lhotsky, Gábor Ónodi, Tamás Rédei, Katalin Szitár, Melinda Halassy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Invasion of alien plant species is one of the main reasons for biodiversity loss in terrestrial ecosystems. However, alien plant species are not evenly distributed in the landscape. We studied which factors determine the actual level of neophyte invasion in a landscape with heterogeneous land-use and which habitats are the most infected. Since neophyte species with different life-forms can respond differently to the factors determining the invasion, species groups of annual, herbaceous perennial and woody neophytes were also analyzed separately. The study was conducted within the field site network of the Kiskun-LTER program (Hungary), in 16 sites of 5 km × 5 km. Fifteen habitat types were distinguished belonging to five major land-use/land cover types (agricultural land, abandoned agricultural land, tree plantation, semi-natural grassland and semi-natural forest). Present and past land-use, landscape composition and environmental variables were included as factors with a potential impact on the level of invasion. The most important factor determining invasion level was present habitat type, followed by the past habitat type of the location and landscape context. Tree plantations, agricultural habitats and recently abandoned agricultural habitats had the highest level of invasion. As expected, annual neophytes were most abundant in agricultural habitats, while perennial herbaceous neophytes were most abundant in old-fields and plantations, and woody neophytes in tree plantations. Past agricultural land-use was reflected in the higher levels of invasion of annuals and perennials, and past forestry practice resulted in higher levels of invasion of woody neophytes. In a landscape with a higher proportion of tree plantations, not only the tree plantations, but primary woodland patches also showed higher levels of invasion by woody neophyte species. Our results indicate the importance of present and past land-use in plant invasion and suggest that tree plantations are hot-spots of plant invasion and threaten the remnants of semi-natural vegetation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)88-98
Number of pages11
JournalAgriculture, Ecosystems and Environment
Volume226
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

plantation
plantations
land use
habitats
habitat type
agricultural land
introduced plants
habitat
abandoned land
forestry practice
old field
silvicultural practices
land cover
terrestrial ecosystem
Hungary
woodlands
woodland
grasslands
grassland
biodiversity

Keywords

  • Land-use change
  • Level of invasion
  • Neophyte
  • Semi-natural forest
  • Semi-natural grassland

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Tree plantations are hot-spots of plant invasion in a landscape with heterogeneous land-use. / Csecserits, Anikó; Botta-Dukát, Z.; Kröel-Dulay, György; Lhotsky, Barbara; Ónodi, Gábor; Rédei, Tamás; Szitár, Katalin; Halassy, Melinda.

In: Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, Vol. 226, 2016, p. 88-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Csecserits, Anikó ; Botta-Dukát, Z. ; Kröel-Dulay, György ; Lhotsky, Barbara ; Ónodi, Gábor ; Rédei, Tamás ; Szitár, Katalin ; Halassy, Melinda. / Tree plantations are hot-spots of plant invasion in a landscape with heterogeneous land-use. In: Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment. 2016 ; Vol. 226. pp. 88-98.
@article{f5e3c401332640b4a9c04d6b09216cae,
title = "Tree plantations are hot-spots of plant invasion in a landscape with heterogeneous land-use",
abstract = "Invasion of alien plant species is one of the main reasons for biodiversity loss in terrestrial ecosystems. However, alien plant species are not evenly distributed in the landscape. We studied which factors determine the actual level of neophyte invasion in a landscape with heterogeneous land-use and which habitats are the most infected. Since neophyte species with different life-forms can respond differently to the factors determining the invasion, species groups of annual, herbaceous perennial and woody neophytes were also analyzed separately. The study was conducted within the field site network of the Kiskun-LTER program (Hungary), in 16 sites of 5 km × 5 km. Fifteen habitat types were distinguished belonging to five major land-use/land cover types (agricultural land, abandoned agricultural land, tree plantation, semi-natural grassland and semi-natural forest). Present and past land-use, landscape composition and environmental variables were included as factors with a potential impact on the level of invasion. The most important factor determining invasion level was present habitat type, followed by the past habitat type of the location and landscape context. Tree plantations, agricultural habitats and recently abandoned agricultural habitats had the highest level of invasion. As expected, annual neophytes were most abundant in agricultural habitats, while perennial herbaceous neophytes were most abundant in old-fields and plantations, and woody neophytes in tree plantations. Past agricultural land-use was reflected in the higher levels of invasion of annuals and perennials, and past forestry practice resulted in higher levels of invasion of woody neophytes. In a landscape with a higher proportion of tree plantations, not only the tree plantations, but primary woodland patches also showed higher levels of invasion by woody neophyte species. Our results indicate the importance of present and past land-use in plant invasion and suggest that tree plantations are hot-spots of plant invasion and threaten the remnants of semi-natural vegetation.",
keywords = "Land-use change, Level of invasion, Neophyte, Semi-natural forest, Semi-natural grassland",
author = "Anik{\'o} Csecserits and Z. Botta-Duk{\'a}t and Gy{\"o}rgy Kr{\"o}el-Dulay and Barbara Lhotsky and G{\'a}bor {\'O}nodi and Tam{\'a}s R{\'e}dei and Katalin Szit{\'a}r and Melinda Halassy",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1016/j.agee.2016.03.024",
language = "English",
volume = "226",
pages = "88--98",
journal = "Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment",
issn = "0167-8809",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tree plantations are hot-spots of plant invasion in a landscape with heterogeneous land-use

AU - Csecserits, Anikó

AU - Botta-Dukát, Z.

AU - Kröel-Dulay, György

AU - Lhotsky, Barbara

AU - Ónodi, Gábor

AU - Rédei, Tamás

AU - Szitár, Katalin

AU - Halassy, Melinda

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Invasion of alien plant species is one of the main reasons for biodiversity loss in terrestrial ecosystems. However, alien plant species are not evenly distributed in the landscape. We studied which factors determine the actual level of neophyte invasion in a landscape with heterogeneous land-use and which habitats are the most infected. Since neophyte species with different life-forms can respond differently to the factors determining the invasion, species groups of annual, herbaceous perennial and woody neophytes were also analyzed separately. The study was conducted within the field site network of the Kiskun-LTER program (Hungary), in 16 sites of 5 km × 5 km. Fifteen habitat types were distinguished belonging to five major land-use/land cover types (agricultural land, abandoned agricultural land, tree plantation, semi-natural grassland and semi-natural forest). Present and past land-use, landscape composition and environmental variables were included as factors with a potential impact on the level of invasion. The most important factor determining invasion level was present habitat type, followed by the past habitat type of the location and landscape context. Tree plantations, agricultural habitats and recently abandoned agricultural habitats had the highest level of invasion. As expected, annual neophytes were most abundant in agricultural habitats, while perennial herbaceous neophytes were most abundant in old-fields and plantations, and woody neophytes in tree plantations. Past agricultural land-use was reflected in the higher levels of invasion of annuals and perennials, and past forestry practice resulted in higher levels of invasion of woody neophytes. In a landscape with a higher proportion of tree plantations, not only the tree plantations, but primary woodland patches also showed higher levels of invasion by woody neophyte species. Our results indicate the importance of present and past land-use in plant invasion and suggest that tree plantations are hot-spots of plant invasion and threaten the remnants of semi-natural vegetation.

AB - Invasion of alien plant species is one of the main reasons for biodiversity loss in terrestrial ecosystems. However, alien plant species are not evenly distributed in the landscape. We studied which factors determine the actual level of neophyte invasion in a landscape with heterogeneous land-use and which habitats are the most infected. Since neophyte species with different life-forms can respond differently to the factors determining the invasion, species groups of annual, herbaceous perennial and woody neophytes were also analyzed separately. The study was conducted within the field site network of the Kiskun-LTER program (Hungary), in 16 sites of 5 km × 5 km. Fifteen habitat types were distinguished belonging to five major land-use/land cover types (agricultural land, abandoned agricultural land, tree plantation, semi-natural grassland and semi-natural forest). Present and past land-use, landscape composition and environmental variables were included as factors with a potential impact on the level of invasion. The most important factor determining invasion level was present habitat type, followed by the past habitat type of the location and landscape context. Tree plantations, agricultural habitats and recently abandoned agricultural habitats had the highest level of invasion. As expected, annual neophytes were most abundant in agricultural habitats, while perennial herbaceous neophytes were most abundant in old-fields and plantations, and woody neophytes in tree plantations. Past agricultural land-use was reflected in the higher levels of invasion of annuals and perennials, and past forestry practice resulted in higher levels of invasion of woody neophytes. In a landscape with a higher proportion of tree plantations, not only the tree plantations, but primary woodland patches also showed higher levels of invasion by woody neophyte species. Our results indicate the importance of present and past land-use in plant invasion and suggest that tree plantations are hot-spots of plant invasion and threaten the remnants of semi-natural vegetation.

KW - Land-use change

KW - Level of invasion

KW - Neophyte

KW - Semi-natural forest

KW - Semi-natural grassland

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84979942232&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84979942232&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.agee.2016.03.024

DO - 10.1016/j.agee.2016.03.024

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84979942232

VL - 226

SP - 88

EP - 98

JO - Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment

JF - Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment

SN - 0167-8809

ER -