Transition from shallow lake to a wetland

A multi-proxy case study in Zalavári Pond, Lake Balaton, Hungary

János Korponai, M. Braun, Krisztina Buczkó, István Gyulai, L. Forró, Judit Nédli, István Papp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lake Balaton, the largest shallow lake in Central Europe, has no natural outlet, therefore, underwent water level changes during its 15,000-17,000 years of history. The lake is very sensitive to both climate changes and human impacts. Surroundings have been inhabited since the Stone Age; however, heavy human impact can be recognized during the past 6000 years. In this study, we established three different stages for and reconstructed water level changes of Lake Balaton by geochemical data, subfossil Cladocera and diatom remains in the sediments of the Zalavári Pond, a part of the Kis-Balaton wetland. In 9900-8600 cal. year BP, climate was dry, water level was low, and there was a wetland in this area. Although organic matter content was low in the sediment, the ratio of Fe/Mn was high. Between 5600 and 5000 cal. year BP, water level increased, Fe/Mn ratio shows that oxygen conditions of sediments was improved in agreement with the relatively low number of diatom remains and dense chydorid remains. About 5000 cal. year BP, water level of Lake Balaton decreased as indicated by high organic content with low carbonate and high Fe/Mn ratio in the sediments (oxygen depletion). At the bottom of this section, high Fe and S concentrations showed accumulation of pyrite (FeS2) that is common in wetlands with very low redox potential. Low abundance of Cladocera remains together with rich and diverse diatom flora confirm the low water level hypothesis. Our data support that the water level of Lake Balaton was higher between 8600 and 5000 cal. year BP than it is at present.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)225-244
Number of pages20
JournalHydrobiologia
Volume641
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

Fingerprint

Hungary
surface water level
wetlands
water level
pond
wetland
case studies
lakes
lake
Bacillariophyceae
sediments
diatom
anthropogenic effect
sediment
anthropogenic activities
Stone Age
oxygen
subfossil
redox potential
Central European region

Keywords

  • Chydorids
  • Cladocera remains
  • Diatoms
  • Lake Balaton
  • Shallow lake
  • Trace metals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Transition from shallow lake to a wetland : A multi-proxy case study in Zalavári Pond, Lake Balaton, Hungary. / Korponai, János; Braun, M.; Buczkó, Krisztina; Gyulai, István; Forró, L.; Nédli, Judit; Papp, István.

In: Hydrobiologia, Vol. 641, No. 1, 02.2010, p. 225-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Korponai, János ; Braun, M. ; Buczkó, Krisztina ; Gyulai, István ; Forró, L. ; Nédli, Judit ; Papp, István. / Transition from shallow lake to a wetland : A multi-proxy case study in Zalavári Pond, Lake Balaton, Hungary. In: Hydrobiologia. 2010 ; Vol. 641, No. 1. pp. 225-244.
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