Transient glucose and amino acid deprivation induces delayed preconditioning in cultured rat cortical neurons

Tamás Gáspár, Béla Kis, James A. Snipes, Gábor Lenzsér, Keita Mayanagi, F. Bari, David W. Busija

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several studies have demonstrated that glucose deprivation, combined either with anoxia or with the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, leads to the development of ischemic tolerance in neurons. The aim of our experiments was to investigate whether similar effects could be achieved by transient energy deprivation without either anoxia or the inhibition of the electron transfer chain. Preconditioning was carried out by incubating primary rat cortical neuronal cultures for 3, 6 or 9 h in a glucose- and amino acid-free balanced salt solution supplemented with B27 in normoxic conditions. After 24 h, neuronal cultures were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation, glutamate or hydrogen peroxide. Cell viability was measured 24 h after the lethal insults. Potential mechanisms that can influence free radical production were also examined. Energy deprivation protected neuronal cells against lethal stimuli (e.g. cell survival after oxygen-glucose deprivation was 33.1 ± 0.52% in the untreated group and 80.1 ± 1.27% in the 9-h energy deprivation group), reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, decreased free radical formation, attenuated the intracellular free calcium surge upon glutamate receptor stimulation, and resulted in an elevated level of GSH. Our findings show that transient energy deprivation induces delayed preconditioning and prevents oxidative injuries and neuronal cell death.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)555-565
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume98
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2006

Fingerprint

Neurons
Rats
Amino Acids
Glucose
Free Radicals
Cell Survival
Cells
Oxygen
Mitochondrial Membrane Potential
Oxidative Phosphorylation
Glutamate Receptors
Cell death
Hydrogen Peroxide
Glutamic Acid
Cell Death
Salts
Electrons
Calcium
Membranes
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Calcium
  • Energy deprivation
  • Neuronal culture
  • Preconditioning
  • Reactive oxygen species
  • Reduced glutathione

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Transient glucose and amino acid deprivation induces delayed preconditioning in cultured rat cortical neurons. / Gáspár, Tamás; Kis, Béla; Snipes, James A.; Lenzsér, Gábor; Mayanagi, Keita; Bari, F.; Busija, David W.

In: Journal of Neurochemistry, Vol. 98, No. 2, 07.2006, p. 555-565.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gáspár, Tamás ; Kis, Béla ; Snipes, James A. ; Lenzsér, Gábor ; Mayanagi, Keita ; Bari, F. ; Busija, David W. / Transient glucose and amino acid deprivation induces delayed preconditioning in cultured rat cortical neurons. In: Journal of Neurochemistry. 2006 ; Vol. 98, No. 2. pp. 555-565.
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