Tick-Borne Flaviviruses, with a Focus on Powassan Virus

Gábor Kemenesi, K. Bányai

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

SUMMARYThe tick-borne pathogen Powassan virus is a rare cause of encephalitis in North America and the Russian Far East. The number of documented cases described since the discovery of Powassan virus in 1958 may be <150, although detection of cases has increased over the past decade. In the United States, the incidence of Powassan virus infections expanded from the estimated 1 case per year prior to 2005 to 10 cases per year during the subsequent decade. The increased detection rate may be associated with several factors, including enhanced surveillance, the availability of improved laboratory diagnostic methods, the expansion of the vector population, and, perhaps, altered human activities that lead to more exposure. Nonetheless, it remains unclear whether Powassan virus is indeed an emerging threat or if enzootic cycles in nature remain more-or-less stable with periodic fluctuations of host and vector population sizes. Despite the low disease incidence, the approximately 10% to 15% case fatality rate of neuroinvasive Powassan virus infection and the temporary or prolonged sequelae in >50% of survivors make Powassan virus a medical concern requiring the attention of public health authorities and clinicians. The medical importance of Powassan virus justifies more research on developing specific and effective treatments and prevention and control measures.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Microbiology Reviews
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Tick-Borne Encephalitis Viruses
Flavivirus
Ticks
Far East
Encephalitis
North America
Public Health
Research

Keywords

  • arbovirus
  • Powassan virus
  • viral encephalitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Tick-Borne Flaviviruses, with a Focus on Powassan Virus. / Kemenesi, Gábor; Bányai, K.

In: Clinical Microbiology Reviews, Vol. 32, No. 1, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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