A kullancsencephalitis

Translated title of the contribution: Tick-borne encephalitis

A. Lakos, E. Ferenczi, A. Ferencz, E. Toth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Tick-borne encephalitis has been known for more than fifty years. It is a rare but often serious illness. The pathogenic agent is an RNS virus, a member of the Flavivirus family. The infection may be inappearent. Double- peaked fever is a typical symptom. Every fifth recognised case shows palsy and it heals with remnant in 50%. In Hungary 5561 cases were recognised from 1968 to 1995. Mortality rate was 1-1.5%. Death affected mainly young males. Fatal outcome is a consequence of tetraparesis and thoracic palsy. Examination of cerebrospinal fluid is obligatory in the suspicion of encephalitis. Pleocytosis is mild: around 100 cells/ml, mainly lymphocytes are found. Virologic diagnosis is supported by serology. Sending a pair of serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples helps the diagnostic process. The knowledge of a previous vaccination against tick-borne encephalitis is extremely important, in the lack of this virological diagnosis may be failed. In the case of prolonged meningitis and fluctuating symptoms coincidental borrelia infection is probable. However, the serologic reaction against borrelia usually delays. Tick-borne encephalitis is autonomous, thus the therapy is only symptomatic. Little rodents are the main reservoirs of the tick-borne encephalitis virus. The virus may also spread transovarially among ticks. The infection is usually caused by tick bite but unboiled milk may be infectious as well. Half of the patients has been recognised in Zala, Somogy, Nograd and Vas counties. In some areas (Tolna, Pest, Nograd and Heves counties) the ratio of serologically examined and recognised cases has been rather high, which indicates unambiguously, that many cases may have remained unrecognised. In Hungary, only 3-5% of the whole population has been vaccinated, so the epidemiology of tick-borne encephalitis probably has remained unchanged so far.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)116-122
Number of pages7
JournalLege Artis Medicinae
Volume7
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1997

Fingerprint

Tick-Borne Encephalitis
Hungary
Paralysis
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Borrelia Infections
Tick Bites
Tick-Borne Encephalitis Viruses
Viruses
Borrelia
Flavivirus
Fatal Outcome
Leukocytosis
Ticks
Encephalitis
Serology
Infection
Meningitis
Rodentia
Milk
Vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lakos, A., Ferenczi, E., Ferencz, A., & Toth, E. (1997). A kullancsencephalitis. Lege Artis Medicinae, 7(3), 116-122.

A kullancsencephalitis. / Lakos, A.; Ferenczi, E.; Ferencz, A.; Toth, E.

In: Lege Artis Medicinae, Vol. 7, No. 3, 1997, p. 116-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lakos, A, Ferenczi, E, Ferencz, A & Toth, E 1997, 'A kullancsencephalitis', Lege Artis Medicinae, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 116-122.
Lakos A, Ferenczi E, Ferencz A, Toth E. A kullancsencephalitis. Lege Artis Medicinae. 1997;7(3):116-122.
Lakos, A. ; Ferenczi, E. ; Ferencz, A. ; Toth, E. / A kullancsencephalitis. In: Lege Artis Medicinae. 1997 ; Vol. 7, No. 3. pp. 116-122.
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