Thromboembolic complication induced stable occlusion of a ruptured basilar tip aneurysm: Case report and review of the literature

Zsolt Kulcsár, Z. Berentei, M. Marosföi, J. Vajda, I. Szikora

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Abstract

We describe a case of a ruptured basilar bifurcation aneurysm that thrombosed during preparation for endovascular therapy as a complication of diagnostic angiogaphy, and showed a favorable evolution during long-term follow-up. Endogenous thrombosis of ruptured, non giant aneurysms is uncommon. The persistence of occlusion over time in such cases is not well established. Two weeks after rupture, a 6 x 8 mm basilar bifurcation aneurysm was referred for endovascular treatment. During preparation for endovascular coil occlusion, without having any endovascular material at the level of the basilar artery, a complete thrombotic occlusion of the basilar bifurcation and aneurysm was observed. Given the good collateral circulation for both posterior cerebral arteries no thrombolysis was undertaken. The early follow-up of seven days, three and six months showed a complete recanalization of the basilar artery and remodeling of the basilar bifurcation. The 20 months imaging follow-up demonstrated a small aneurysm regrowth at the prevoius location that remained stable during the follow-up of seven years. Unchanged biological and hemodynamic characteristics, however, may pose an elevated risk of a new aneurysm formation over time, making long-term imaging follow-up, and in case of progression, aneurysm occlusion necessary for the patient.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-88
Number of pages6
JournalInterventional Neuroradiology
Volume16
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

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Aneurysm
Basilar Artery
Thrombosis
Posterior Cerebral Artery
Collateral Circulation
Rupture
Hemodynamics
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Aneurysm regrowth
  • Cerebral aneurysm
  • Spontaneous thrombosis
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage
  • Wessel wall remodeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Thromboembolic complication induced stable occlusion of a ruptured basilar tip aneurysm : Case report and review of the literature. / Kulcsár, Zsolt; Berentei, Z.; Marosföi, M.; Vajda, J.; Szikora, I.

In: Interventional Neuroradiology, Vol. 16, No. 1, 03.2010, p. 83-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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