Three-dimensional femtosecond laser processing for lab-on-a-chip applications

Felix Sima, Koji Sugioka, Rebeca Martínez Vázquez, Roberto Osellame, L. Kelemen, P. Ormos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The extremely high peak intensity associated with ultrashort pulse width of femtosecond laser allows us to induce nonlinear interaction such as multiphoton absorption and tunneling ionization with materials that are transparent to the laser wavelength. More importantly, focusing the femtosecond laser beam inside the transparent materials confines the nonlinear interaction only within the focal volume, enabling three-dimensional (3D) micro- and nanofabrication. This 3D capability offers three different schemes, which involve undeformative, subtractive, and additive processing. The undeformative processing preforms internal refractive index modification to construct optical microcomponents including optical waveguides. Subtractive processing can realize the direct fabrication of 3D microfluidics, micromechanics, microelectronics, and photonic microcomponents in glass. Additive processing represented by two-photon polymerization enables the fabrication of 3D polymer micro- and nanostructures for photonic and microfluidic devices. These different schemes can be integrated to realize more functional microdevices including lab-on-a-chip devices, which are miniaturized laboratories that can perform reaction, detection, analysis, separation, and synthesis of biochemical materials with high efficiency, high speed, high sensitivity, low reagent consumption, and low waste production. This review paper describes the principles and applications of femtosecond laser 3D micro- and nanofabrication for lab-on-a-chip applications. A hybrid technique that promises to enhance functionality of lab-on-a-chip devices is also introduced.

Original languageEnglish
JournalUnknown Journal
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 26 2018

Fingerprint

Lab-on-a-chip
Ultrashort pulses
Lasers
chips
lab-on-a-chip devices
Optics and Photonics
Microtechnology
nanofabrication
Microfabrication
Lab-On-A-Chip Devices
Processing
Nanotechnology
Microfluidics
Photonics
lasers
photonics
Fabrication
Equipment and Supplies
multiphoton absorption
Refractometry

Keywords

  • 3D fabrication
  • additive manufacturing
  • femtosecond lasers
  • lab-on-a-chip
  • subtractive manufacturing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Three-dimensional femtosecond laser processing for lab-on-a-chip applications. / Sima, Felix; Sugioka, Koji; Vázquez, Rebeca Martínez; Osellame, Roberto; Kelemen, L.; Ormos, P.

In: Unknown Journal, 26.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sima, Felix ; Sugioka, Koji ; Vázquez, Rebeca Martínez ; Osellame, Roberto ; Kelemen, L. ; Ormos, P. / Three-dimensional femtosecond laser processing for lab-on-a-chip applications. In: Unknown Journal. 2018.
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