Thermal and chemical stimulations of the hypothalamic heat detectors: the effects of the EEG.

G. Benedek, F. Obál, Z. Lelkes, F. Obál

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In acute immobilized rats, the effect on the EEG of thermal and chemical (capsaicin microinjection) stimulation of the warm sensors in the preoptic region, mid-hypothalamic area and posterior hypothalamus were studied. Both localized heating and capsaicin resulted in a sleep-like EEG with spindles and slow waves. Stimulation of the posterior hypothalamus was the most effective and stimulation in the mid-hypothalamus was the least effective in inducing spindle activity. Since capsaicin is regarded as a specific stimulant for the hypothalamic warm sensors, the results suggest that the EEG effect, and probably the sleep-inducing effect, of heat are mediated via the central thermoreceptors, and cannot be due to a non-specific activation of the basal forebrain hypnogenic mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-35
Number of pages9
JournalActa Physiologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Volume60
Issue number1-2
Publication statusPublished - 1982

Fingerprint

Chemical Stimulation
Capsaicin
Posterior Hypothalamus
Electroencephalography
Hot Temperature
Sleep
Thermoreceptors
Microinjections
Heating
Hypothalamus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Thermal and chemical stimulations of the hypothalamic heat detectors : the effects of the EEG. / Benedek, G.; Obál, F.; Lelkes, Z.; Obál, F.

In: Acta Physiologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae, Vol. 60, No. 1-2, 1982, p. 27-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{9240a2313f264bb78e33caa851dd5c2c,
title = "Thermal and chemical stimulations of the hypothalamic heat detectors: the effects of the EEG.",
abstract = "In acute immobilized rats, the effect on the EEG of thermal and chemical (capsaicin microinjection) stimulation of the warm sensors in the preoptic region, mid-hypothalamic area and posterior hypothalamus were studied. Both localized heating and capsaicin resulted in a sleep-like EEG with spindles and slow waves. Stimulation of the posterior hypothalamus was the most effective and stimulation in the mid-hypothalamus was the least effective in inducing spindle activity. Since capsaicin is regarded as a specific stimulant for the hypothalamic warm sensors, the results suggest that the EEG effect, and probably the sleep-inducing effect, of heat are mediated via the central thermoreceptors, and cannot be due to a non-specific activation of the basal forebrain hypnogenic mechanisms.",
author = "G. Benedek and F. Ob{\'a}l and Z. Lelkes and F. Ob{\'a}l",
year = "1982",
language = "English",
volume = "60",
pages = "27--35",
journal = "Physiology International",
issn = "2498-602X",
publisher = "Akademiai Kiado",
number = "1-2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Thermal and chemical stimulations of the hypothalamic heat detectors

T2 - the effects of the EEG.

AU - Benedek, G.

AU - Obál, F.

AU - Lelkes, Z.

AU - Obál, F.

PY - 1982

Y1 - 1982

N2 - In acute immobilized rats, the effect on the EEG of thermal and chemical (capsaicin microinjection) stimulation of the warm sensors in the preoptic region, mid-hypothalamic area and posterior hypothalamus were studied. Both localized heating and capsaicin resulted in a sleep-like EEG with spindles and slow waves. Stimulation of the posterior hypothalamus was the most effective and stimulation in the mid-hypothalamus was the least effective in inducing spindle activity. Since capsaicin is regarded as a specific stimulant for the hypothalamic warm sensors, the results suggest that the EEG effect, and probably the sleep-inducing effect, of heat are mediated via the central thermoreceptors, and cannot be due to a non-specific activation of the basal forebrain hypnogenic mechanisms.

AB - In acute immobilized rats, the effect on the EEG of thermal and chemical (capsaicin microinjection) stimulation of the warm sensors in the preoptic region, mid-hypothalamic area and posterior hypothalamus were studied. Both localized heating and capsaicin resulted in a sleep-like EEG with spindles and slow waves. Stimulation of the posterior hypothalamus was the most effective and stimulation in the mid-hypothalamus was the least effective in inducing spindle activity. Since capsaicin is regarded as a specific stimulant for the hypothalamic warm sensors, the results suggest that the EEG effect, and probably the sleep-inducing effect, of heat are mediated via the central thermoreceptors, and cannot be due to a non-specific activation of the basal forebrain hypnogenic mechanisms.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0020350779&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0020350779&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7184305

AN - SCOPUS:0020350779

VL - 60

SP - 27

EP - 35

JO - Physiology International

JF - Physiology International

SN - 2498-602X

IS - 1-2

ER -