The vulnerability of plant-pollinator communities to honeybee decline: A comparative network analysis in different habitat types

Anikó Kovács-Hostyánszki, Rita Földesi, A. Báldi, Anett Endrédi, Ferenc Jordán

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The populations of most pollinators, including honeybees, are declining that heavily affects both crop and wild plant pollination. Wild bee diversity and habitat type may modulate these effects. We addressed the question how the structure of plant-pollinator networks in different habitat types may influence the vulnerability of pollinator communities to the hypothetical loss of honeybees. We performed network analysis based on plant-visitation data in a traditional agricultural landscape and quantified the structural vulnerability (i.e. the effect of the loss of honeybee) of the plant-pollinator networks by a topological index (distance-based fragmentation). We found that very different plant-pollinator communities inhabited the studied different agricultural habitat types. The early summer arable fields had the most, pastures in mid-summer had the less vulnerable structure and, in general, an intermediate plant/pollinator ratio was associated with high vulnerability in the absence of honeybees. We suggest that increased plant species richness can ensure higher wild bee diversity and more stable plant-pollinator networks without honeybee, where flower-visitation can rely more on wild bees. Decreased management intensity in agricultural landscapes can therefore contribute to the maintenance of diverse plant-pollinator communities in agricultural landscapes and to sustainable farming.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-50
Number of pages16
JournalEcological Indicators
Volume97
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2019

Fingerprint

honeybee
network analysis
pollinating insects
pollinator
habitat type
honey bees
vulnerability
habitats
bee
Apoidea
agricultural land
Vulnerability
Network analysis
Habitat
crop plant
summer
wild plants
sustainable agriculture
pollination
pasture

Keywords

  • Distance-based fragmentation
  • Ecological interactions
  • Macroscopic indicators
  • Plant-pollinator network

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Decision Sciences(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

Cite this

The vulnerability of plant-pollinator communities to honeybee decline : A comparative network analysis in different habitat types. / Kovács-Hostyánszki, Anikó; Földesi, Rita; Báldi, A.; Endrédi, Anett; Jordán, Ferenc.

In: Ecological Indicators, Vol. 97, 01.02.2019, p. 35-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kovács-Hostyánszki, Anikó ; Földesi, Rita ; Báldi, A. ; Endrédi, Anett ; Jordán, Ferenc. / The vulnerability of plant-pollinator communities to honeybee decline : A comparative network analysis in different habitat types. In: Ecological Indicators. 2019 ; Vol. 97. pp. 35-50.
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