The use of counter-current distribution to examine the effect of damaging agents on DNA

A. Jeney, B. W. Fox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Mammalian DNA's were separated using a counter-current distribution system for demonstrating alteration in secondary structure after heat denaturation and drug treatment. By using this method a complete separation of native and denatured DNA was achieved. Although the separation of DNA depends on the temperature used for denaturation, the counter-current distribution pattern did not follow exactly the hyperchromic shift. The results suggest that counter-current distribution offers a complementary approach for the study of DNA secondary structure as this method reveals alterations occurring over a wider temperature range than the increase in ultraviolet absorption. The changes in distribution pattern demonstrate cross-linkage occurring with nitrogen mustard and single-strand breaks following methylene dimethanesulphonate (MDMS) treatment in vitro.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)265-275
Number of pages11
JournalChemico-Biological Interactions
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1973

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Denaturation
DNA
Drug therapy
Mechlorethamine
Temperature
Hot Temperature
Pharmaceutical Preparations
methylene dimethanesulfonate
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

Cite this

The use of counter-current distribution to examine the effect of damaging agents on DNA. / Jeney, A.; Fox, B. W.

In: Chemico-Biological Interactions, Vol. 7, No. 5, 1973, p. 265-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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