The use of associated particle timing based on the D + D reaction for elemental analysis of bulk samples such as the human body

C. J. Evans, G. Pető, S. Al-Lehyani, J. B. Darko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of associated particle timing based on the D + D reaction has been demonstrated for elemental analysis of bulk samples such as the human body. The neutron energy of 2.8 MeV eliminates the background from organic matrices. The nanosecond timing of a HPGe detector renders it possible to identify the spatial origin of the measured γ radiation limiting the sensitive area to a single pixel. By this technique the background could be reduced by a factor of ≤ 1000, but the present set-up has achieved an effective factor only in the range 20-100, due to losses in the generation of timing signals. The very clean γ-spectra obtained permit the use of high efficiency scintillation detectors. Sensitivities for measuring Al, Ti, and Fe are presented at an extrapolated dose of 10 mSv.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-266
Number of pages10
JournalApplied Radiation and Isotopes
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1997

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human body
time measurement
detectors
scintillation
pixels
neutrons
dosage
sensitivity
radiation
matrices
energy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiation

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The use of associated particle timing based on the D + D reaction for elemental analysis of bulk samples such as the human body. / Evans, C. J.; Pető, G.; Al-Lehyani, S.; Darko, J. B.

In: Applied Radiation and Isotopes, Vol. 48, No. 2, 02.1997, p. 257-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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