The role of perfectionism, social phobia, self-efficacy and life satisfaction in the background of trait anxiety

Bianka Dobos, B. Pikó

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS OF THE STUDY: Anxiety related studies often investigate the personality factors and possible comorbid anxiety disorders that may underly trait anxiety. Women have higher prevalence rates across anxiety disorders, so we chose to examine the trait anxiety, perfectionism, self-efficacy and life satisfaction in a group of female participants. METHOD: An online, self-reported questionnaire was used as an online method of data collection. The sample consisted of young women aged between 15-35 (N = 435, M = 27.3 years; SD = 5.9). Besides from measuring trait anxiety, questionnaires regarding participants' social phobia, perfectionism, self-efficacy and life satisfaction have been used. We used correlational analysis to show the bivariate connection between trait anxiety and other variables, furthermore its relationship with the subscales of perfectionism. Mean values of the scales were compared with Student t-test in different groups by the levels of social phobia. Finally, multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to explore the role of social phobia, perfectionism, self-efficacy and life satisfaction in the background of trait anxiety. RESULTS: Trait anxiety correlated significantly with perfectionism (r = 0.43, p < 0.01) and social phobia (r = 0.40, p < 0.01). Higher trait anxiety was found in the social phobia group (t = -12.97, p < 0.001). Participants with social phobia had less self-efficacy (t = 9.36, p < 0.001) and were less likely to be satisfied with their lives (t = 5,71, p < 0,001). Results of regression show that social phobia (β = 0.25, p < 0.001) and perfectionism (β = 0.27, p < 0.001) contributed to higher trait anxiety, while satisfaction with life (β = -0.39, p < 0.001) and self-efficacy (β = -0.30, p < 0.001) resulted in having less trait anxiety. All together the variables explained 71% of the variance. CONCLUSIONS: Perfectionism and social phobia play a substantial role in the background of trait anxiety. On the other hand, higher perceived self-efficacy and satisfaction with life come together with less anxiety.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)347-358
Number of pages12
JournalPsychiatria Hungarica : A Magyar Pszichiatriai Tarsasag tudomanyos folyoirata
Volume33
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

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Self Efficacy
Anxiety
Anxiety Disorders
Social Phobia
Perfectionism
Personality
Linear Models
Regression Analysis
Students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "The role of perfectionism, social phobia, self-efficacy and life satisfaction in the background of trait anxiety",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND AIMS OF THE STUDY: Anxiety related studies often investigate the personality factors and possible comorbid anxiety disorders that may underly trait anxiety. Women have higher prevalence rates across anxiety disorders, so we chose to examine the trait anxiety, perfectionism, self-efficacy and life satisfaction in a group of female participants. METHOD: An online, self-reported questionnaire was used as an online method of data collection. The sample consisted of young women aged between 15-35 (N = 435, M = 27.3 years; SD = 5.9). Besides from measuring trait anxiety, questionnaires regarding participants' social phobia, perfectionism, self-efficacy and life satisfaction have been used. We used correlational analysis to show the bivariate connection between trait anxiety and other variables, furthermore its relationship with the subscales of perfectionism. Mean values of the scales were compared with Student t-test in different groups by the levels of social phobia. Finally, multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to explore the role of social phobia, perfectionism, self-efficacy and life satisfaction in the background of trait anxiety. RESULTS: Trait anxiety correlated significantly with perfectionism (r = 0.43, p < 0.01) and social phobia (r = 0.40, p < 0.01). Higher trait anxiety was found in the social phobia group (t = -12.97, p < 0.001). Participants with social phobia had less self-efficacy (t = 9.36, p < 0.001) and were less likely to be satisfied with their lives (t = 5,71, p < 0,001). Results of regression show that social phobia (β = 0.25, p < 0.001) and perfectionism (β = 0.27, p < 0.001) contributed to higher trait anxiety, while satisfaction with life (β = -0.39, p < 0.001) and self-efficacy (β = -0.30, p < 0.001) resulted in having less trait anxiety. All together the variables explained 71{\%} of the variance. CONCLUSIONS: Perfectionism and social phobia play a substantial role in the background of trait anxiety. On the other hand, higher perceived self-efficacy and satisfaction with life come together with less anxiety.",
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N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS OF THE STUDY: Anxiety related studies often investigate the personality factors and possible comorbid anxiety disorders that may underly trait anxiety. Women have higher prevalence rates across anxiety disorders, so we chose to examine the trait anxiety, perfectionism, self-efficacy and life satisfaction in a group of female participants. METHOD: An online, self-reported questionnaire was used as an online method of data collection. The sample consisted of young women aged between 15-35 (N = 435, M = 27.3 years; SD = 5.9). Besides from measuring trait anxiety, questionnaires regarding participants' social phobia, perfectionism, self-efficacy and life satisfaction have been used. We used correlational analysis to show the bivariate connection between trait anxiety and other variables, furthermore its relationship with the subscales of perfectionism. Mean values of the scales were compared with Student t-test in different groups by the levels of social phobia. Finally, multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to explore the role of social phobia, perfectionism, self-efficacy and life satisfaction in the background of trait anxiety. RESULTS: Trait anxiety correlated significantly with perfectionism (r = 0.43, p < 0.01) and social phobia (r = 0.40, p < 0.01). Higher trait anxiety was found in the social phobia group (t = -12.97, p < 0.001). Participants with social phobia had less self-efficacy (t = 9.36, p < 0.001) and were less likely to be satisfied with their lives (t = 5,71, p < 0,001). Results of regression show that social phobia (β = 0.25, p < 0.001) and perfectionism (β = 0.27, p < 0.001) contributed to higher trait anxiety, while satisfaction with life (β = -0.39, p < 0.001) and self-efficacy (β = -0.30, p < 0.001) resulted in having less trait anxiety. All together the variables explained 71% of the variance. CONCLUSIONS: Perfectionism and social phobia play a substantial role in the background of trait anxiety. On the other hand, higher perceived self-efficacy and satisfaction with life come together with less anxiety.

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