The role of neural cell adhesion molecules in plasticity and repair

J. Kiss, E. Troncoso, Z. Djebbara, L. Vutskits, D. Muller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

122 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Repair and functional recovery after critically depends on structural and functional plasticity of preserved neuronal networks. A striking feature of brain structures where tissue reorganization and plasticity occur is a strong expression of the polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM). An important role of this molecule in various aspects of neuronal and synaptic plasticity has been revealed by many studies. Recently, a new mechanism has been elucidated whereby PSA-NCAM may contribute to signalling mediated by the neurotrophic factor BDNF, thereby sensitizing neurons to this growth factor. This mechanism was shown to be important for activity-induced synaptic plasticity and for the survival and differentiation of cortical neurons. A cross-talk between these molecules may, thus, reveal a key factor for properties of structural plasticity and in particular could mediate the activity-dependent aspects of synaptic network remodeling. Animal models have been developed to assess the role of these molecules in functional recovery after lesions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-184
Number of pages10
JournalBrain Research Reviews
Volume36
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules
Neuronal Plasticity
Neurons
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Nerve Growth Factors
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Animal Models
Brain

Keywords

  • BDNF
  • Cell adhesion
  • Cell signalling
  • Central nervous system
  • Functional recovery
  • Plasticity
  • PSA-NCAM

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

The role of neural cell adhesion molecules in plasticity and repair. / Kiss, J.; Troncoso, E.; Djebbara, Z.; Vutskits, L.; Muller, D.

In: Brain Research Reviews, Vol. 36, No. 2-3, 2001, p. 175-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kiss, J, Troncoso, E, Djebbara, Z, Vutskits, L & Muller, D 2001, 'The role of neural cell adhesion molecules in plasticity and repair', Brain Research Reviews, vol. 36, no. 2-3, pp. 175-184. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0165-0173(01)00093-5
Kiss, J. ; Troncoso, E. ; Djebbara, Z. ; Vutskits, L. ; Muller, D. / The role of neural cell adhesion molecules in plasticity and repair. In: Brain Research Reviews. 2001 ; Vol. 36, No. 2-3. pp. 175-184.
@article{36ff6f18a96845dfbbeb4827547402a8,
title = "The role of neural cell adhesion molecules in plasticity and repair",
abstract = "Repair and functional recovery after critically depends on structural and functional plasticity of preserved neuronal networks. A striking feature of brain structures where tissue reorganization and plasticity occur is a strong expression of the polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM). An important role of this molecule in various aspects of neuronal and synaptic plasticity has been revealed by many studies. Recently, a new mechanism has been elucidated whereby PSA-NCAM may contribute to signalling mediated by the neurotrophic factor BDNF, thereby sensitizing neurons to this growth factor. This mechanism was shown to be important for activity-induced synaptic plasticity and for the survival and differentiation of cortical neurons. A cross-talk between these molecules may, thus, reveal a key factor for properties of structural plasticity and in particular could mediate the activity-dependent aspects of synaptic network remodeling. Animal models have been developed to assess the role of these molecules in functional recovery after lesions.",
keywords = "BDNF, Cell adhesion, Cell signalling, Central nervous system, Functional recovery, Plasticity, PSA-NCAM",
author = "J. Kiss and E. Troncoso and Z. Djebbara and L. Vutskits and D. Muller",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1016/S0165-0173(01)00093-5",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "175--184",
journal = "Brain Research Reviews",
issn = "0165-0173",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2-3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of neural cell adhesion molecules in plasticity and repair

AU - Kiss, J.

AU - Troncoso, E.

AU - Djebbara, Z.

AU - Vutskits, L.

AU - Muller, D.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Repair and functional recovery after critically depends on structural and functional plasticity of preserved neuronal networks. A striking feature of brain structures where tissue reorganization and plasticity occur is a strong expression of the polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM). An important role of this molecule in various aspects of neuronal and synaptic plasticity has been revealed by many studies. Recently, a new mechanism has been elucidated whereby PSA-NCAM may contribute to signalling mediated by the neurotrophic factor BDNF, thereby sensitizing neurons to this growth factor. This mechanism was shown to be important for activity-induced synaptic plasticity and for the survival and differentiation of cortical neurons. A cross-talk between these molecules may, thus, reveal a key factor for properties of structural plasticity and in particular could mediate the activity-dependent aspects of synaptic network remodeling. Animal models have been developed to assess the role of these molecules in functional recovery after lesions.

AB - Repair and functional recovery after critically depends on structural and functional plasticity of preserved neuronal networks. A striking feature of brain structures where tissue reorganization and plasticity occur is a strong expression of the polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM). An important role of this molecule in various aspects of neuronal and synaptic plasticity has been revealed by many studies. Recently, a new mechanism has been elucidated whereby PSA-NCAM may contribute to signalling mediated by the neurotrophic factor BDNF, thereby sensitizing neurons to this growth factor. This mechanism was shown to be important for activity-induced synaptic plasticity and for the survival and differentiation of cortical neurons. A cross-talk between these molecules may, thus, reveal a key factor for properties of structural plasticity and in particular could mediate the activity-dependent aspects of synaptic network remodeling. Animal models have been developed to assess the role of these molecules in functional recovery after lesions.

KW - BDNF

KW - Cell adhesion

KW - Cell signalling

KW - Central nervous system

KW - Functional recovery

KW - Plasticity

KW - PSA-NCAM

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034749125&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034749125&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0165-0173(01)00093-5

DO - 10.1016/S0165-0173(01)00093-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 11690614

AN - SCOPUS:0034749125

VL - 36

SP - 175

EP - 184

JO - Brain Research Reviews

JF - Brain Research Reviews

SN - 0165-0173

IS - 2-3

ER -