Korokozok szerepe az atherosclerosis etiologiajaban es patogeneziseben

Translated title of the contribution: The role of infectious agents in the etiology and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

I. Valyi-Nagy, M. Peto, D. Virók, K. Burián, A. Császár, K. Heltai, E. Gönczöl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The well-known risk factors of atherosclerosis (high level of serum cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking) can only be recognized in about half of the patients. Atherosclerosis begins in childhood. In vivo and in vitro data suggest that certain pathogens, like the intracellular bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae (member of the Chlamydia genus) and cytomegalovirus (member of the herpesvirus family) may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Both pathogens infect the population in childhood. Infected patients are often symptom-free, sometimes Chlamydia pneumoniae may cause respiratory disease. Both Chlamydia pneumoniae and cytomegalovirus can be detected in atherosclerotic plaques and patients with atherosclerosis carry pathogen-specific antibodies more frequently and in higher titers. Aortic lesions similar to human atherosclerotic plaques can be induced by infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae or cytomegalovirus in experimental animals. Antichlamydial treatment results in the regression of these lesions in the infected animals. In vitro infection of tissue culture cells of human arterial origin with Chlamydia pneumoniae or cytomegalovirus results in the induction of cellular changes characteristic to atherosclerosis. Strategies to prevent or treat atherosclerosis might be complemented by antimicrobial treatment if the infectious origin of the disease is further confirmed.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)284-290
Number of pages7
JournalLege Artis Medicinae
Volume10
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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Chlamydophila pneumoniae
Atherosclerosis
Cytomegalovirus
Atherosclerotic Plaques
Chlamydia
Herpesviridae
Infection
Hypercholesterolemia
Communicable Diseases
Cell Culture Techniques
Smoking
Hypertension
Bacteria
Antibodies
Therapeutics
Serum
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Korokozok szerepe az atherosclerosis etiologiajaban es patogeneziseben. / Valyi-Nagy, I.; Peto, M.; Virók, D.; Burián, K.; Császár, A.; Heltai, K.; Gönczöl, E.

In: Lege Artis Medicinae, Vol. 10, No. 4, 2000, p. 284-290.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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