The role of CR2 in autoimmunity

Andrea Isaák, J. Prechl, J. Gergely, A. Erdei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Complement activation is one of the most powerful mechanisms taking place during inflammation and immune responses. Over the last 30 years increasing evidence has proven the role of C3 and receptors for its activation fragments in the initiation and regulation of immune responses. Since complement also has a basic importance in the maintenance of immune homeostasis, abnormalities affecting complement proteins and their receptors may lead to pathological conditions. Autoimmune conditions develop as a result of a range of genetic and environmental factors. Findings obtained from animal models support the notion that malfunctioning of complement receptors, particularly CR2, might be involved in the breakdown of tolerance and excessive antibody production by auto reactive B-cell clones. In addition to B cells, activated, CR2-bearing T cells may also contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity as they can receive activating/survival signals in the inflamed tissue. Results obtained from mouse experiments however, should be extended to the human system with great care, since there are basic differences between the structure and function of human and murine CR1 and CR2.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)357-366
Number of pages10
JournalAutoimmunity
Volume39
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2006

Fingerprint

Autoimmunity
B-Lymphocytes
Complement Receptors
Complement Activation
Antibody Formation
Complement System Proteins
Homeostasis
Animal Models
Clone Cells
Maintenance
Inflammation
T-Lymphocytes
Survival

Keywords

  • Autoimmunity
  • B cells
  • Complement
  • CR2
  • T cells
  • Tolerance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

The role of CR2 in autoimmunity. / Isaák, Andrea; Prechl, J.; Gergely, J.; Erdei, A.

In: Autoimmunity, Vol. 39, No. 5, 08.2006, p. 357-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Isaák, Andrea ; Prechl, J. ; Gergely, J. ; Erdei, A. / The role of CR2 in autoimmunity. In: Autoimmunity. 2006 ; Vol. 39, No. 5. pp. 357-366.
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