Az adrenalis és a gonadális hormonok szerepe az autoimmun polyarthritisek patogenezisében.

Translated title of the contribution: The role of adrenal and gonadal hormones in the pathogenesis of autoimmune polyarthritis

Edit Tóth, C. Horváth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A growing body of recently published results suggest the role of adrenal androgens in the onset and development of chronic inflammatory process due to autoantigens. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate (DHEA)--the major androgen products of the adrenal gland--have immunosuppressive effect inhibiting interleukin-6 production and substantially determining acute phase reaction. Decreased serum levels of DHEA and DHEAS has been observed in most of autoimmune diseases. Recent data suggest that adrenal hypoandrogenism comes from disturbed neuroendocrine, regulation due to hypothalamic effect of the inflammatory cytokines. On the other side, decreased adrenal androgen activity negatively influences the anabolic tonus of steroid hormone system while a relative enhancement of catabolic pressure occurs by the glucocorticoids. Moreover, the hypothalamus-hypophysis-gonadal axis can also be involved, resulting shifts in serum levels of prolactin, estrogens and gonadal androgens. All these hormonal changes can be summarised in decreasing the immunosuppressive tonus. This hypothesis connects the endocrine dysregulation with the development of autoimmune disorders. The new results promise not only a basically different theory of chronic inflammation but they will permit using new diagnostic tools as well as inducing substantially new and more effective therapeutic approaches.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)1121-1128
Number of pages8
JournalOrvosi Hetilap
Volume143
Issue number20
Publication statusPublished - May 19 2002

Fingerprint

Gonadal Hormones
Androgens
Arthritis
Dehydroepiandrosterone
Immunosuppressive Agents
Testosterone Congeners
Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate
Acute-Phase Reaction
Pituitary Gland
Adrenal Glands
Serum
Prolactin
Glucocorticoids
Hypothalamus
Autoimmune Diseases
Interleukin-6
Estrogens
Hormones
Cytokines
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Az adrenalis és a gonadális hormonok szerepe az autoimmun polyarthritisek patogenezisében. / Tóth, Edit; Horváth, C.

In: Orvosi Hetilap, Vol. 143, No. 20, 19.05.2002, p. 1121-1128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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