The rise of life on earth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Looking like a planet adrift in space, a tiny ball of carbon holds a world of meaning: Nestled in a cavity etched from 3.86-billion-year-old rock (colored here for contrast), it may be the oldest evidence of life on Earth. The specimen, found on what is now an island off Greenland, has lost all anatomical features, yet scientists believe its biochemistry was similar to that of every life-form that has evolved since.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54
Number of pages1
JournalNational Geographic
Volume193
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1998

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Biochemistry
Planets
Earth (planet)
Rocks
Carbon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

The rise of life on earth. / Mojzsis, S.

In: National Geographic, Vol. 193, No. 3, 03.1998, p. 54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mojzsis, S 1998, 'The rise of life on earth', National Geographic, vol. 193, no. 3, pp. 54.
Mojzsis, S. / The rise of life on earth. In: National Geographic. 1998 ; Vol. 193, No. 3. pp. 54.
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