The Relationship of Anatomical and Functional Connectivity to Resting-State Connectivity in Primate Somatosensory Cortex

Zheng Wang, Li Min Chen, László Négyessy, Robert M. Friedman, Arabinda Mishra, John C. Gore, Anna W. Roe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies of resting-state activity in the brain have provoked critical questions about the brain@s functional organization, but the biological basis of this activity is not clear. Specifically, the relationships between interregional correlations in resting-state measures of activity, neuronal functional connectivity and anatomical connectivity are much debated. To investigate these relationships, we have examined both anatomical and steady-state functional connectivity within the hand representation of primary somatosensory cortex (areas 3b and 1) in anesthetized squirrel monkeys. The comparison of three data sets (fMRI, electrophysiological, and anatomical) indicate two primary axes of information flow within the SI:prominent interdigit interactions within area 3b and predominantly homotopic interactions between area 3b and area 1. These data support a strikingly close relationship between baseline functional connectivity and anatomical connections. This study extends findings derived from large-scale cortical networks to the realm of local millimeter-scale networks

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1116-1126
Number of pages11
JournalNeuron
Volume78
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 19 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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