The relationship between repetition suppression and face perception

Petra Hermann, Mareike Grotheer, Gyula Kovács, Z. Vidnyánszky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Repetition of identical face stimuli leads to fMRI response attenuation (fMRI adaptation, fMRIa) in the core face-selective occipito-temporal visual cortical network, involving the bilateral fusiform face area (FFA) and the occipital face area (OFA). However, the functional relevance of fMRIa observed in these regions is unclear as of today. Therefore, here we aimed at investigating the relationship between fMRIa and face perception ability by measuring in the same human participants both the repetition-induced reduction of fMRI responses and identity discrimination performance outside the scanner for upright and inverted face stimuli. In the correlation analysis, the behavioral and fMRI results for the inverted faces were used as covariates to control for the individual differences in overall object perception ability and basic visual feature adaptation processes, respectively. The results revealed a significant positive correlation between the participants’ identity discrimination performance and the strength of fMRIa in the core face processing network, but not in the extrastriate body area (EBA). Furthermore, we found a strong correlation of the fMRIa between OFA and FFA and also between OFA and EBA, but not between FFA and EBA. These findings suggest that there is a face-selective component of the repetition-induced reduction of fMRI responses within the core face processing network, which reflects functionally relevant adaptation processes involved in face identity perception.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalBrain Imaging and Behavior
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jul 23 2016

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Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Aptitude
Facial Recognition
Individuality

Keywords

  • Face discrimination
  • FFA
  • fMRI adaptation
  • OFA
  • Repetition suppression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

The relationship between repetition suppression and face perception. / Hermann, Petra; Grotheer, Mareike; Kovács, Gyula; Vidnyánszky, Z.

In: Brain Imaging and Behavior, 23.07.2016, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hermann, Petra ; Grotheer, Mareike ; Kovács, Gyula ; Vidnyánszky, Z. / The relationship between repetition suppression and face perception. In: Brain Imaging and Behavior. 2016 ; pp. 1-11.
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