The relationship between built-up areas and the spatial development of the mean maximum urban heat island in Debrecen, Hungary

Zsolt Bottyán, Andrea Kircsi, Sándor Szegedi, J. Unger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The climate of built-up regions differs significantly from rural regions and the most important modifying effect of urbanization on local climate is the urban temperature excess, otherwise called the urban heat island (UHI). This study examines the influence of built-up areas on the near- surface air temperature field in the case of the medium-sized city of Debrecen, Hungary. Mobile measurements were used under different weather conditions between March 2002 and March 2003. Efforts concentrated on the determination of the spatial distribution of mean maximum UHI intensity with special regard to land-use features such as built-up ratio and its areal extensions. In both (heating and non-heating) seaso ns the spatial distribution of the UHI intensity field showed a basically concentric shape with local anomalies. The mean maximum UHI intensity reaches more than 2.0°C (heating season) and 2.5°C (non-heating season) in the centre of the city. We established the relationship between the above-mentioned land-use parameters and mean maximum UHI intensity by means of multiple linear regression analysis. As the measured and predicted mean maximum UHI intensity patterns show, there is an obvious connection between the spatial distribution of urban thermal excess and the land-use parameters examined, so these parameters play a significant role in the development of the strong UHI intensity field over the city.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)405-418
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Climatology
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 15 2005

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heat island
spatial distribution
land use
heating
climate
built-up area
urbanization
regression analysis
surface temperature
air temperature
anomaly
parameter
city

Keywords

  • Built-up ratio
  • Debrecen
  • Grid network
  • Hungary
  • Regression equations
  • Spatial and seasonal patterns
  • Statistical analysis
  • UHI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

The relationship between built-up areas and the spatial development of the mean maximum urban heat island in Debrecen, Hungary. / Bottyán, Zsolt; Kircsi, Andrea; Szegedi, Sándor; Unger, J.

In: International Journal of Climatology, Vol. 25, No. 3, 15.03.2005, p. 405-418.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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