The possible role of anaerobic bacteria in chronic prostatitis

I. Szöke, L. Török, E. Dósa, E. Nagy, S. Scultéty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prostatitis, the most common urological disease in men, afflicts between 25 and 50%;, of all adult men. Four clinical categories are recognized: acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis, non-bacterial prostatitis and prostatodynia. The role of Gram-positive aerobic bacteria and the different anaerobes in chronic bacterial prostatitis is still a matter of debate. During this study, the urethral discharge and the prostatic fluid obtained after prostatic massage of 50 patients with chronic prostatitis, confirmed by clinical examination and resistant to empirical quinolone therapy, were cultured under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The parallel specimens from 24 patients exhibited high colony counts of Gram-positive and Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria, either alone (18 cases) or in combination with aerobic bacteria (6 cases). The specimens obtained after prostatic massage of the remaining 26 patients were completely negative for both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. No Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum or Trichomonas vaginalis were isolated from these patients. Patients with chronic prostatitis who gave positive culture results for anaerobes were treated with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid or clindamycin for 3-6 weeks. After treatment, samples were again taken and cultured for all pathogens known to cause prostatitis. These post-therapeutic samples revealed a decrease or total elimination of the symptoms, and no anaerobic bacteria could be detected.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)163-168
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Andrology
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Prostatitis
Anaerobic Bacteria
Aerobic Bacteria
Massage
Gram-Negative Anaerobic Bacteria
Mycoplasma hominis
Ureaplasma urealyticum
Urologic Diseases
Trichomonas vaginalis
Amoxicillin-Potassium Clavulanate Combination
Clindamycin
Chlamydia trachomatis
Quinolones
Gram-Positive Bacteria
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Anaerobic bacteria
  • Chronic prostatitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

Cite this

The possible role of anaerobic bacteria in chronic prostatitis. / Szöke, I.; Török, L.; Dósa, E.; Nagy, E.; Scultéty, S.

In: International Journal of Andrology, Vol. 21, No. 3, 1998, p. 163-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Szöke, I. ; Török, L. ; Dósa, E. ; Nagy, E. ; Scultéty, S. / The possible role of anaerobic bacteria in chronic prostatitis. In: International Journal of Andrology. 1998 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 163-168.
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