The pathogenetic role of heme in pregnancy-induced hypertension-like disease in ewes

Gyula Tálosi, I. Németh, E. Nagy, S. Pintér

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Abstract

Toxicosis syndrome of fasting pregnant ewes has a close similarity to human preeclampsia (hypertension, albuminuria). The common etiological factor 'might be oxidative hemolysis and heme-induced endothelial damage. Ewes (5 starving, 5 control) at 130-135 gestational days with a 96-h fasting period followed by refeeding were used. Blood pressure, platelet count, electrolytes, kidney and liver function parameters, as well as plasma glucose, hemoglobin/heme, free thiol groups and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, and plasma iron and ferritin levels were measured. Statistical significance was assessed using Student's t test (P <0.05). Besides hypertension and renal disturbances, hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count, characteristic of human HELLP syndrome, were also present. In the first 24 h of glucose deprivation there was a significant rise in both the plasma hemoglobin/heme and indirect bilirubin concentrations. The antioxidant free thiol levels decreased significantly the next day, without any change in the total antioxidant capacity of the plasma. While the loss of calcium and magnesium levels related to the similarity to preeclampsia, reduced plasma iron concentrations referred to species differences in iron homeostasis. An oxidative stress causing hemolysis in a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient animal model was proven by the loss of free thiols after glucose deprivation. The activation of the oxidative stress protein heme oxygenase was a signal of endothelial cell injury, the primary cause of pregnancy-induced hypertension.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)58-64
Number of pages7
JournalBiochemical and Molecular Medicine
Volume62
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1997

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Pregnancy Induced Hypertension
Heme
Plasmas
Hemolysis
Sulfhydryl Compounds
Oxidative stress
Iron
Antioxidants
Platelets
Pre-Eclampsia
Platelet Count
Glucose
Liver
Fasting
Hemoglobins
Oxidative Stress
HELLP Syndrome
Heme Oxygenase (Decyclizing)
Renal Hypertension
Albuminuria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

The pathogenetic role of heme in pregnancy-induced hypertension-like disease in ewes. / Tálosi, Gyula; Németh, I.; Nagy, E.; Pintér, S.

In: Biochemical and Molecular Medicine, Vol. 62, No. 1, 10.1997, p. 58-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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