The occurence of transcrystallization or row-nucleated cylindritic crystallization as a result of shearing in a glass-fiber-reinforced polypropylene

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Abstract

The formation and build-up of transcystalline-like superstructures produced by pulling a glass fiber (GF) from an isothermal crystallizing (Tc = 130-140°C) isotactic polypropylene (iPP) melt has been studied by thermo-optical methods. It was found that these morphological structures are caused by row-nucleation (self-nucleation), and that they should therefore be termed cylindrites instead of transcrystalline layers. The build-up of the cylindrites depends on whether the pulling and crystallization temperatures (Tpull and Tc, respectively) are above or below the upper threshold temperature of the possible β crystallization (Tβα). The thermal stability and β nucleation ability of the primary α row-nuclei at Tpull = Tc < Tβα depend on their molecular orientation, caused by the shear stress field accommodated during pulling. In addition, the thermal stability of the row-nuclie is also affected by Tpull. It is suggested that the observed α-β bifurcation at Tpull = Tc < Tβα, which is the main argument for cylindritic crystallization, may be related to epitaxial growth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-198
Number of pages8
JournalComposites Science and Technology
Volume48
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993

Keywords

  • crystallization
  • cylindrite
  • glass fiber
  • isotactic polypropylene
  • isothermal crystallization
  • memory effect
  • polypropylene
  • row-nucleation
  • shear effects
  • thermo-optical study
  • transcrystallization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Engineering(all)

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