The need for community pharmacists in oncology outpatient care

a systematic review

Johannes Thoma, R. Zelkó, Balázs Hankó

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background One-third of all deaths in Europe each year are attributable to cancer. Issues relating to cancer care, therefore, will continue to expand. To manage the increased challenges—including doctor shortages, an ageing population, and rural distribution of supplies—community pharmacists will likely be required to assume responsibility within oncology care. Aim of the review To assess the need for further investigation into quantity and utility of community pharmacists’ interventions in assisting oncology outpatients. Methods Initial search terms for identifying relevant literature within the PubMed database were informed by four key questions. Study selection for the systematic review was performed based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, which were defined a priori using the PICO tool. Literature searches identified 2470 papers, for which titles and abstracts were reviewed. Of these, 220 papers were retained for detailed analysis. The full texts of these manuscripts were then screened by applying the inclusion criteria. The remaining 68 papers were included in the systematic review. Results Several models of pharmacists’ interventions in inpatient, medium, and outpatient care have proven to be successful, have been consistently efficacious, and have positively influenced patient outcomes. Importantly, the quantity of scientific research, and thus of reported beneficial outcomes, in outpatient care is much lower than that conducted for inpatient and medium care. Conclusion Based on our findings, we suggest that further investigation of community pharmacists’ interventions into oncology outpatient assistance is necessary, and that further research should be conducted to address this need.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical Pharmacy
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Apr 7 2016

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Oncology
Ambulatory Care
Pharmacists
Inpatients
Outpatients
Manuscripts
Aging of materials
Research
PubMed
Neoplasms
Demography
Databases

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Community pharmacist
  • Intervention
  • Oncology
  • Pharmaceutical Care
  • Review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Pharmacology
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacy

Cite this

The need for community pharmacists in oncology outpatient care : a systematic review. / Thoma, Johannes; Zelkó, R.; Hankó, Balázs.

In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, 07.04.2016, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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