The N1 hypothesis of distraction

Auditory N1 and the mismatch negativity are generated by functionally-distinct processes within the human brain

Tom A. Campbell, I. Winkler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

While louder noises are more audible from a distance, loudness per se does not pre-determine the disruptive properties of extraneous noise. Arguably, auditory distraction is a question of more prominent economic and human relevance, answerable by cognitive neuroscience. The N1 hypothesis was tested that factors related to the generation of N1 could cause auditory distraction. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were derived to ignored tones presented during the retention interval of a delayed serial task. For the first time, ERP components Mismatch negativity (MMN) and N1, occurring during the same time range, were measured to discern spatiotemporal and functional properties of their generation in this time range. A pitch-varying 9-token sequence (containing "control" tones) was more disruptive than a 1-token sequence (containing a repeated "standard" tone). Relative to a 1-token sequence, no significant disruptive advantage was seen with the oddball sequence (containing "deviants"). Control tones elicited augmented N1 amplitudes over standard tones, yet deviants elicited an additional augment (MMN) with distinct temporal properties and topography. MMN and N1 are thus functionally-distinct components of the auditory ERP. The N1 hypothesis was supported. That is, factors related to N1, not MMN, could cause the auditory distraction effects shown.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInstitute of Noise Control Engineering of the USA - 35th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2006
Pages4255-4264
Number of pages10
Volume6
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Event35th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2006 - Honolulu, HI, United States
Duration: Dec 3 2006Dec 6 2006

Other

Other35th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2006
CountryUnited States
CityHonolulu, HI
Period12/3/0612/6/06

Fingerprint

brain
neurology
loudness
causes
economics
topography
intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Campbell, T. A., & Winkler, I. (2006). The N1 hypothesis of distraction: Auditory N1 and the mismatch negativity are generated by functionally-distinct processes within the human brain. In Institute of Noise Control Engineering of the USA - 35th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2006 (Vol. 6, pp. 4255-4264)

The N1 hypothesis of distraction : Auditory N1 and the mismatch negativity are generated by functionally-distinct processes within the human brain. / Campbell, Tom A.; Winkler, I.

Institute of Noise Control Engineering of the USA - 35th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2006. Vol. 6 2006. p. 4255-4264.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Campbell, TA & Winkler, I 2006, The N1 hypothesis of distraction: Auditory N1 and the mismatch negativity are generated by functionally-distinct processes within the human brain. in Institute of Noise Control Engineering of the USA - 35th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2006. vol. 6, pp. 4255-4264, 35th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2006, Honolulu, HI, United States, 12/3/06.
Campbell TA, Winkler I. The N1 hypothesis of distraction: Auditory N1 and the mismatch negativity are generated by functionally-distinct processes within the human brain. In Institute of Noise Control Engineering of the USA - 35th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2006. Vol. 6. 2006. p. 4255-4264
Campbell, Tom A. ; Winkler, I. / The N1 hypothesis of distraction : Auditory N1 and the mismatch negativity are generated by functionally-distinct processes within the human brain. Institute of Noise Control Engineering of the USA - 35th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2006. Vol. 6 2006. pp. 4255-4264
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