The mechanism of evagination of imaginal discs of Drosophila melanogaster - II. Studies on trypsin-accelerated evagination

Eva Fekete, Dianne Fristrom, I. Kiss, James W. Fristrom

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Abstract

The effects of trypsin treatment on the in vitro evagination of imaginal discs under different conditions are investigated. It is found that trypsin accelerates the evagination of dises which have previously been exposed to ecdysone in vivo or in vitro. Substances which inhibit ecdysone-induced (unaccelerated) evagination, such as Cytochalasin B, Concanavalin A and Mycostatin also inhibit trypsin-accelerated evagination. On the cellular level, evagination is associated with the flattening of the disc cells. However, immature discs (i.e., those which have not been exposed to ecdysone) and discs pretreated with Cytochalasin B do not evaginate in response to trypsin even though pronounced cell flattening occurs. Cell flattening is an energy requiring process since it does not occur in response to trypsin treatment in the presence of oligomycin or nitrogen We conclude that cell flattening is an active process that takes place during evagination but which does not itself produce evagination. An alternative mechanism for evagination may involve cell rearrangement. Trypsinization could facilitate both cell flattening and cell rearrangement by reducing intercellular adhesiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-138
Number of pages16
JournalWilhelm Roux's Archives of Developmental Biology
Volume178
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1975

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Imaginal Discs
imaginal discs
Drosophila melanogaster
Trypsin
trypsin
Ecdysone
nitrogen
ecdysone
energy
cytochalasin B
cells
Cytochalasin B
oligomycin
nystatin
Oligomycins
Nystatin
process energy
Adhesiveness
concanavalin A
Concanavalin A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

The mechanism of evagination of imaginal discs of Drosophila melanogaster - II. Studies on trypsin-accelerated evagination. / Fekete, Eva; Fristrom, Dianne; Kiss, I.; Fristrom, James W.

In: Wilhelm Roux's Archives of Developmental Biology, Vol. 178, No. 2, 06.1975, p. 123-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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