The Mammary Gland in Mucosal and Regional Immunity

J. E. Butler, Pascal Rainard, John Lippolis, Henri Salmon, I. Kacskovics

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mammary gland (MG) lacks a mucosa but is part of the mucosal immune system because of its role in passive mucosal immunity. The MG is not an inductive site for mucosal immunity. Rather, synthesis of immunoglobulin (Ig)A by plasma cells stimulated at distal inductive sites dominate in the milk of rodents, humans, and swine whereas IgG1 derived from serum predominates in ruminants. Despite the considerable biodiversity in the role of the MG, IgG passively transfers the maternal systemic immunological experience whereas IgA transfers the mucosal immunological experience. Although passive antibodies are protective, they and other lacteal constituents can be immunoregulatory. Immune protection of the MG largely depends on the innate immune system; the monocytes-macrophages group together with intraepithelial lymphocytes is dominant in the healthy gland. An increase in somatic cells (neutrophils) and various interleukins signal infection (mastitis) and a local immune response in the MG. The major role of the MG to mucosal immunity is the passive immunity supplied to the suckling neonate.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMucosal Immunology: Fourth Edition
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages2269-2306
Number of pages38
Volume2-2
ISBN (Print)9780124159754, 9780124158474
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2015

Fingerprint

Mucosal Immunity
Human Mammary Glands
Immunoglobulin A
Immune System
Immunoglobulin G
Mastitis
Interleukins
Biodiversity
Ruminants
Human Milk
Plasma Cells
Monocytes
Immunity
Rodentia
Milk
Mucous Membrane
Neutrophils
Swine
Macrophages
Mothers

Keywords

  • Cell trafficking
  • Ig transport
  • Innate immunity
  • Mammary gland
  • Neonatal immunity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Butler, J. E., Rainard, P., Lippolis, J., Salmon, H., & Kacskovics, I. (2015). The Mammary Gland in Mucosal and Regional Immunity. In Mucosal Immunology: Fourth Edition (Vol. 2-2, pp. 2269-2306). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-415847-4.00116-6

The Mammary Gland in Mucosal and Regional Immunity. / Butler, J. E.; Rainard, Pascal; Lippolis, John; Salmon, Henri; Kacskovics, I.

Mucosal Immunology: Fourth Edition. Vol. 2-2 Elsevier Inc., 2015. p. 2269-2306.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Butler, JE, Rainard, P, Lippolis, J, Salmon, H & Kacskovics, I 2015, The Mammary Gland in Mucosal and Regional Immunity. in Mucosal Immunology: Fourth Edition. vol. 2-2, Elsevier Inc., pp. 2269-2306. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-415847-4.00116-6
Butler JE, Rainard P, Lippolis J, Salmon H, Kacskovics I. The Mammary Gland in Mucosal and Regional Immunity. In Mucosal Immunology: Fourth Edition. Vol. 2-2. Elsevier Inc. 2015. p. 2269-2306 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-415847-4.00116-6
Butler, J. E. ; Rainard, Pascal ; Lippolis, John ; Salmon, Henri ; Kacskovics, I. / The Mammary Gland in Mucosal and Regional Immunity. Mucosal Immunology: Fourth Edition. Vol. 2-2 Elsevier Inc., 2015. pp. 2269-2306
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