A machiavellisták

Ügyes döntéshozók. Kognitív heurisztikák agyi korrelátumai társasdilemma-feladatban

Translated title of the contribution: The machiavellianists: Skilled decision makers. Neural correlates of cognitive heuristics in a social dilemma dilemma situation

T. Bereczkei, Deák Anita, Papp Péter, Perlaki Gábor, Orsi Gergely

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Machiavellians successfully exploit others in spite of their deficits in social cognition, especially in mindreading ability. Former studies have revealed that they are highly sensitive to signals in a social dilemma situation and capable of making flexible decisions in the changing contexts. The question is, what cognitive abilities and their neural correlates are involved in Machiavellian people's decision making processes? We predicted that high-Mach persons would show elevated activity in the brain areas involved in reward-seeking, anticipation of risky situations, and inference making. To test this hypothesis, we used an fMRI technique to examine individuals as they played the Trust game. In accordance with predictions, elevated activities were found in the high Machs' thalamus, anterior cingu-late cortex, and dorsal anterior insula/inferior frontal gyrus. These results suggest that in spite of their poor performance in mentalization and emotional intelligence, Machiavellians may have cognitive heuristics by which they can make quick and accurate decisions using relatively little information about contextual variables of the social environment. Their success in exploiting others may result from their skill at inferring possible actions from the others' behavior and anticipating reward and threat to their self-interest that may yield a relatively large final payoff for them.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)337-362
Number of pages26
JournalMagyar Pszichologiai Szemle
Volume69
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2014

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Aptitude
Reward
Decision Making
Emotional Intelligence
Social Environment
Prefrontal Cortex
Thalamus
Cognition
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain
Heuristics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

A machiavellisták : Ügyes döntéshozók. Kognitív heurisztikák agyi korrelátumai társasdilemma-feladatban. / Bereczkei, T.; Anita, Deák; Péter, Papp; Gábor, Perlaki; Gergely, Orsi.

In: Magyar Pszichologiai Szemle, Vol. 69, No. 2, 01.06.2014, p. 337-362.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bereczkei, T. ; Anita, Deák ; Péter, Papp ; Gábor, Perlaki ; Gergely, Orsi. / A machiavellisták : Ügyes döntéshozók. Kognitív heurisztikák agyi korrelátumai társasdilemma-feladatban. In: Magyar Pszichologiai Szemle. 2014 ; Vol. 69, No. 2. pp. 337-362.
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