The judgement of adhesion formation following laparoscopic and conventional cholecystectomy in an animal model.

E. M. Gamal, P. Metzger, I. Mikó, G. Szabó, E. Bráth, J. Kiss, I. Furka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The development of postoperative adhesions remains an almost inevitable consequence of visceral and gynaecologic surgery, appearing in 50-95% of all patients. Although decreased adhesion formation is one of the accepted advantages of laparoscopic surgery, only a small number of prospective studies have been done to support this claim. AIMS OF THE STUDY: To evaluate the extent of postoperative adhesion formation after laparoscopic and open cholecystectomy. MATERIAL AND METHOD: 60 experimental laparoscopic cholecystectomies (LC) were performed by qualified surgeons in dogs with the aim to acquire the laparoscopic technique. To assess the relation between the complications during the operation (bleeding, injury to the liver substance or gallbladder perforation) and the formation of adhesions, the surviving animals were divided into 4 groups according to the complications occurred. The assessment of the results was made by second--look laparoscopy 4 weeks following LC using the adhesion index. As a control group open cholecystectomy was then performed in 5 dogs without intraoperative complications. RESULTS: No adhesion formation was observed in the groups where no intraoperative complications occurred. In all the cases where bleeding or injury to the liver bed occurred adhesion formation occurred. No adhesion formation was observed in case of gallbladder perforation. In all the animals of the control group adhesion formation was observed. CONCLUSION: It seems that LC has a reduced rate of adhesion formation when compared with the open technique. Complications such as bleeding or injury to the liver substance during LC can enhance adhesion formation. No adhesion formation can be mentioned in relation with gallbladder perforation when the laparoscopic technique is applied.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-172
Number of pages4
JournalActa Chirurgica Hungarica
Volume38
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1999

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Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy
Animal Models
Gallbladder
Intraoperative Complications
Hemorrhage
Laparoscopy
Liver
Wounds and Injuries
Dogs
Control Groups
Cholecystectomy
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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The judgement of adhesion formation following laparoscopic and conventional cholecystectomy in an animal model. / Gamal, E. M.; Metzger, P.; Mikó, I.; Szabó, G.; Bráth, E.; Kiss, J.; Furka, I.

In: Acta Chirurgica Hungarica, Vol. 38, No. 2, 1999, p. 169-172.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Bráth, E.

AU - Kiss, J.

AU - Furka, I.

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