The involvement of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe sep9/spt8+ gene in the regulation of septum cleavage

Gyula Batta, Zsolt Szilagyi, Miklos Laczik, Matthias Sipiczki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Schizosaccharomyces cells divide by medial septation, followed by enzymatic degradation of parts of the septum (septum cleavage) to allow the sister cells to separate from each other. In a previous study we found that the cell separation mutant sep9-307 was defective in a gene that encodes a protein highly similar in sequence to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Spt8, a subunit of the SAGA complex. Here, we show that the sep9-307 mutation causes a frameshift in translation. The deletion of sep9+ is not lethal but abolishes normal septum cleavage by reducing the activity of ace2+, a gene coding for a transcription factor of numerous genes producing proteins for septum cleavage. Indirect evidence indicates that Sep9 might also act directly in the transcription of certain target genes (e.g. eng1+) of this regulator. sep9-307 is synthetically lethal with mutations in the cell separation genes sep11/med18+ and sep15/med8+, which encode subunits of the general transcription factor mediator. Heterologous expression of SPT8 and the putative Schizosaccharomyces japonicus sep9 + orthologue cannot substitute for sep9+. Both Spt8 and the fission yeast proteins have highly acidic (74-76 amino-acid long) N-terminal regions with no sequence conservation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)757-767
Number of pages11
JournalFEMS Yeast Research
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2009

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Keywords

  • Cell division
  • Mediator
  • SAGA
  • Spt8
  • Transcription

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

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