The influence of the cyclic structure of hydrocarbons on radiation protection

G. Földiák, L. Wojnárovits

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Abstract

The G(H2)-values of mixtures containing C5C8 aliphatic normal or cyclic alkanes and monoalkenes with equal number of carbon atoms and the G(H2)-values of the pure components were determined at 35±3°C using a dose of 4·4 Mrad provided by a 60Co-source of 80 kCi activity. It was established that the behaviour of cyclic saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons in radiation chemical processes differs in many respects from that of the straight-chain alkanes and alkenes. For example, the G(H2)-values of straight-chain alkenes slightly increase with increasing number of carbon atoms; in the case of C5C8 cycloalkenes, however, these values decrease in the order cyclopentene ≥cyclohexene>cycloheptene>cyclooctene. The extent of the "protecting effect" in the saturated-unsaturated hydrocarbon mixtures is estimated from the ratio of the G(H2)-value calculated on the basis of the linear mixing rule of a mixture to that obtained by measurement. It was found that the extent of the protecting effect of a given unsaturated hydrocarbon is greater when it is mixed with a normal than with a cyclic hydrocarbon having the same number of carbon atoms. The explanation suggested is that the strained structures of cycloalkanes make them more likely than straight-chain hydrocarbons to employ the energy supplied by irradiation for fast chemical decomposition, and thus the possibility of energy and charge transfer reactions taking place is reduced (i.e. the reactions become proportionately less important). There seems to be a definite relationship between the G(H2)-values of mixtures of normal alkane with terminal normal alkene mixtures and of pure terminal normal monoalkenes and the number of double bonds per unit mass of the irradiated sample.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-197
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal for Radiation Physics and Chemistry
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1972

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radiation protection
alkanes
hydrocarbons
cyclic hydrocarbons
alkenes
carbon
atoms
energy transfer
charge transfer
decomposition
dosage
irradiation
radiation
energy

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The influence of the cyclic structure of hydrocarbons on radiation protection. / Földiák, G.; Wojnárovits, L.

In: International Journal for Radiation Physics and Chemistry, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1972, p. 189-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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