Einfluß von Pockenimpfviren auf menschliche Chromosomen in vivo und in vitro

Translated title of the contribution: The influence od vaccinia viruses on human chromosomes in vitro and in vitro

D. Schuler, S. Hervei, G. Gács, M. Kirchner, J. Szathmáry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Contradictory views are expressed in the literature on the question as to whether viruses induce anomalies in chromosomes. Vaccinia viruses in particular are generally stated to cause chromatid and chromosome breakage in L-cells (human embryonal lung tissue). The subject of the present paper is an experimental investigation of the effect of vaccinia viruses on the chromosomes of human blood lymphocytes. In the in vivo portion of this investigation the chromosomes were examined during and after viremia subsequent to vaccination. Only two of the eight vaccinated children examined showed a larger number of chromosome breaks during viremia than unvaccinated controls. This might possibly be due to different degrees of viremia, although local and general reactions were the same. Other causes might also be sought in vivo or in vitro, such as preparation of the chromosomes, or an unnoted mycoplasma infection of the lymphocyte cultures. In the in vitro portion of this investigation, cultures of human lymphocytes were infected with vaccinia viruses at different stages of incubation. In culture the virus concentrations exhibited a rapid initial decrease, which gradually tapered off during the period of observation. No increases in virus concentration were noted. The longer the period of infection with caccinia virus, the less growth shown by the lymphocytes, and the more mitotic cells with in toto destruction of the chromosome. Anomalies in individual chromosomes were not observed any more frequently than in controls.

Original languageGerman
Pages (from-to)55-60
Number of pages6
JournalHuman Genetics
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1968

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Vaccinia virus
Human Chromosomes
Chromosomes
Viremia
Lymphocytes
Viruses
Chromosome Breakage
Mycoplasma Infections
Chromatids
Vaccination
Observation
In Vitro Techniques
Lung
Growth
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Genetics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Einfluß von Pockenimpfviren auf menschliche Chromosomen in vivo und in vitro. / Schuler, D.; Hervei, S.; Gács, G.; Kirchner, M.; Szathmáry, J.

In: Human Genetics, Vol. 6, No. 1, 07.1968, p. 55-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schuler, D. ; Hervei, S. ; Gács, G. ; Kirchner, M. ; Szathmáry, J. / Einfluß von Pockenimpfviren auf menschliche Chromosomen in vivo und in vitro. In: Human Genetics. 1968 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 55-60.
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