The importance of studying active giant stars in eclipsing binaries-And the role of citizen scientists in finding them

K. Oláh, S. Rappaport, A. Derekas, A. Vanderburg, Tom Jacobs, Daryll LaCourse, Martti Kristiansen, Hans Martin Schwengeler, Ivan Terentev

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Red giant stars with deep convection zones and rapid rotation main-tain a strong surface magnetic field which may alter their observable astrophys-ical parameters. The resulting lower surface temperature due to spots makes the inferred masses and ages from evolutionary tracks uncertain. Eclipsing bi-naries having an active giant component can help in finding the stellar mass independently. However, until the recent space missions it was nearly impossible to find such systems from the ground. Since the evolution on the giant branch is rapid, the number of binaries containing giant stars is low. The eclipses, if the incli-nation allows, are very shallow, on the order of the photometric accuracy from the ground, due to the large brightness difference between a red giant primary and its solar size or smaller secondary. And, the typically acquired data from the ground are not uniform or continuous. In this paper, a few new eclipsing binaries are presented with active giant components observed by TESS and discovered by citizen scientists, which are worthy of further studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)390-394
Number of pages5
JournalContributions of the Astronomical Observatory Skalnate Pleso
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Active stars
  • Eclipsing binaries
  • Space photometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

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