The immunopathological role of vitamin D in patients with SLE: Data from a single centre registry in Hungary

P. Szodoray, T. Tarr, A. Bazso, G. Poór, G. Szegedi, E. Kiss

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Abstract

Objectives: Disproportionate vitamin D levels may play an important role in the development of certain systemic autoimmune and rheumatic diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to compare serological and clinical parameters in patients with different vitamin D levels from a single centre registry in Central-Eastern Europe. Methods: A total of 177 patients with SLE were enrolled in the study. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels were measured by chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). Autoantibody profiles, complement 3 (C3) and C4, clinical symptoms, and disease activity (using the SLE disease activity index, SLEDAI) of the patients were assessed. Results: Vitamin D concentration in the total SLE group investigated was 26.88 ± 13.25 ng/mL. Vitamin D levels were normal (≥ 30 ng/mL) in 18.1% of patients, insufficient (15-30 ng/mL) in 44.6%, and deficient (<15 ng/mL) in 37.3%. The vitamin levels were significantly reduced in postmenopausal compared to premenopausal patients (p = 0.02). Patients with pericarditis (p = 0.013), neuropsychiatric diseases (p = 0.01), and deep vein thrombosis (p = 0.014) had reduced vitamin D levels. SLEDAI score was significantly increased in patients with reduced vitamin D levels (p = 0.038). Anti-double-stranded (ds)DNA autoantibody concentrations increased from normal to insufficient and further increased from insufficient to deficient patient subsets (p = 0.021). Anti-Smith antigen (anti-Sm) concentrations increased (p <0.001), C4 levels decreased (p = 0.027), and immunoglobulin (Ig)G concentration increased (p = 0.034) in patients with reduced vitamin D levels. Conclusions: Our data suggest that vitamin D deficiency in SLE may play a role in perpetuation of the disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-126
Number of pages5
JournalScandinavian Journal of Rheumatology
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

Fingerprint

Hungary
Vitamin D
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Registries
Autoantibodies
Complement C4
Eastern Europe
Complement C3
Vitamin D Deficiency
Pericarditis
Rheumatic Diseases
Immunoassay
Vitamins
Venous Thrombosis
Autoimmune Diseases
Immunoglobulin G
Antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

@article{c56e5fc1375247de9f6f2ab0476c5fad,
title = "The immunopathological role of vitamin D in patients with SLE: Data from a single centre registry in Hungary",
abstract = "Objectives: Disproportionate vitamin D levels may play an important role in the development of certain systemic autoimmune and rheumatic diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to compare serological and clinical parameters in patients with different vitamin D levels from a single centre registry in Central-Eastern Europe. Methods: A total of 177 patients with SLE were enrolled in the study. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels were measured by chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). Autoantibody profiles, complement 3 (C3) and C4, clinical symptoms, and disease activity (using the SLE disease activity index, SLEDAI) of the patients were assessed. Results: Vitamin D concentration in the total SLE group investigated was 26.88 ± 13.25 ng/mL. Vitamin D levels were normal (≥ 30 ng/mL) in 18.1{\%} of patients, insufficient (15-30 ng/mL) in 44.6{\%}, and deficient (<15 ng/mL) in 37.3{\%}. The vitamin levels were significantly reduced in postmenopausal compared to premenopausal patients (p = 0.02). Patients with pericarditis (p = 0.013), neuropsychiatric diseases (p = 0.01), and deep vein thrombosis (p = 0.014) had reduced vitamin D levels. SLEDAI score was significantly increased in patients with reduced vitamin D levels (p = 0.038). Anti-double-stranded (ds)DNA autoantibody concentrations increased from normal to insufficient and further increased from insufficient to deficient patient subsets (p = 0.021). Anti-Smith antigen (anti-Sm) concentrations increased (p <0.001), C4 levels decreased (p = 0.027), and immunoglobulin (Ig)G concentration increased (p = 0.034) in patients with reduced vitamin D levels. Conclusions: Our data suggest that vitamin D deficiency in SLE may play a role in perpetuation of the disease.",
author = "P. Szodoray and T. Tarr and A. Bazso and G. Po{\'o}r and G. Szegedi and E. Kiss",
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T1 - The immunopathological role of vitamin D in patients with SLE

T2 - Data from a single centre registry in Hungary

AU - Szodoray, P.

AU - Tarr, T.

AU - Bazso, A.

AU - Poór, G.

AU - Szegedi, G.

AU - Kiss, E.

PY - 2011/3

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N2 - Objectives: Disproportionate vitamin D levels may play an important role in the development of certain systemic autoimmune and rheumatic diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to compare serological and clinical parameters in patients with different vitamin D levels from a single centre registry in Central-Eastern Europe. Methods: A total of 177 patients with SLE were enrolled in the study. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels were measured by chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). Autoantibody profiles, complement 3 (C3) and C4, clinical symptoms, and disease activity (using the SLE disease activity index, SLEDAI) of the patients were assessed. Results: Vitamin D concentration in the total SLE group investigated was 26.88 ± 13.25 ng/mL. Vitamin D levels were normal (≥ 30 ng/mL) in 18.1% of patients, insufficient (15-30 ng/mL) in 44.6%, and deficient (<15 ng/mL) in 37.3%. The vitamin levels were significantly reduced in postmenopausal compared to premenopausal patients (p = 0.02). Patients with pericarditis (p = 0.013), neuropsychiatric diseases (p = 0.01), and deep vein thrombosis (p = 0.014) had reduced vitamin D levels. SLEDAI score was significantly increased in patients with reduced vitamin D levels (p = 0.038). Anti-double-stranded (ds)DNA autoantibody concentrations increased from normal to insufficient and further increased from insufficient to deficient patient subsets (p = 0.021). Anti-Smith antigen (anti-Sm) concentrations increased (p <0.001), C4 levels decreased (p = 0.027), and immunoglobulin (Ig)G concentration increased (p = 0.034) in patients with reduced vitamin D levels. Conclusions: Our data suggest that vitamin D deficiency in SLE may play a role in perpetuation of the disease.

AB - Objectives: Disproportionate vitamin D levels may play an important role in the development of certain systemic autoimmune and rheumatic diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to compare serological and clinical parameters in patients with different vitamin D levels from a single centre registry in Central-Eastern Europe. Methods: A total of 177 patients with SLE were enrolled in the study. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels were measured by chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). Autoantibody profiles, complement 3 (C3) and C4, clinical symptoms, and disease activity (using the SLE disease activity index, SLEDAI) of the patients were assessed. Results: Vitamin D concentration in the total SLE group investigated was 26.88 ± 13.25 ng/mL. Vitamin D levels were normal (≥ 30 ng/mL) in 18.1% of patients, insufficient (15-30 ng/mL) in 44.6%, and deficient (<15 ng/mL) in 37.3%. The vitamin levels were significantly reduced in postmenopausal compared to premenopausal patients (p = 0.02). Patients with pericarditis (p = 0.013), neuropsychiatric diseases (p = 0.01), and deep vein thrombosis (p = 0.014) had reduced vitamin D levels. SLEDAI score was significantly increased in patients with reduced vitamin D levels (p = 0.038). Anti-double-stranded (ds)DNA autoantibody concentrations increased from normal to insufficient and further increased from insufficient to deficient patient subsets (p = 0.021). Anti-Smith antigen (anti-Sm) concentrations increased (p <0.001), C4 levels decreased (p = 0.027), and immunoglobulin (Ig)G concentration increased (p = 0.034) in patients with reduced vitamin D levels. Conclusions: Our data suggest that vitamin D deficiency in SLE may play a role in perpetuation of the disease.

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