The hippocampal CA3 region can generate two distinct types of sharp wave-ripple complexes, in vitro

Katharina T. Hofer, Ágnes Kandrács, I. Ulbert, Ildikó Pál, Csilla Szabó, László Héja, L. Wittner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hippocampal sharp wave-ripples (SPW-Rs) occur during slow wave sleep and behavioral immobility and are thought to play an important role in memory formation. We investigated the cellular and network properties of SPW-Rs with simultaneous laminar multielectrode and intracellular recordings in a rat hippocampal slice model, using physiological bathing medium. Spontaneous SPW-Rs were generated in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA3, and CA1 regions. These events were characterized by a local field potential gradient (LFPg) transient, increased fast oscillatory activity and increased multiple unit activity (MUA). Two types of SPW-Rs were distinguished in the CA3 region based on their different LFPg and current source density (CSD) pattern. Type 1 (T1) displayed negative LFPg transient in the pyramidal cell layer, and the associated CSD sink was confined to the proximal dendrites. Type 2 (T2) SPW-Rs were characterized by positive LFPg transient in the cell layer, and showed CSD sinks involving both the apical and basal dendrites. In both types, consistent with the somatic CSD source, only a small subset of CA3 pyramidal cells fired, most pyramidal cells were hyperpolarized, while most interneurons increased firing rate before the LFPg peak. Different neuronal populations, with different proportions of pyramidal cells and distinct subsets of interneurons were activated during T1 and T2 SPW-Rs. Activation of specific inhibitory cell subsets-with the possible leading role of perisomatic interneurons-seems to be crucial to synchronize distinct ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells finally resulting in the expression of different SPW-R activities. This suggests that the hippocampus can generate dynamic changes in its activity stemming from the same excitatory and inhibitory circuits, and so, might provide the cellular and network basis for an input-specific and activity-dependent information transmission.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-186
Number of pages18
JournalHippocampus
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2015

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Hippocampal CA3 Region
Pyramidal Cells
Interneurons
Dendrites
Dentate Gyrus
Hippocampus
Sleep
In Vitro Techniques
Population

Keywords

  • Current source density
  • Linear multielectrode
  • Network oscillation
  • Perisomatic interneuron
  • Rat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The hippocampal CA3 region can generate two distinct types of sharp wave-ripple complexes, in vitro. / Hofer, Katharina T.; Kandrács, Ágnes; Ulbert, I.; Pál, Ildikó; Szabó, Csilla; Héja, László; Wittner, L.

In: Hippocampus, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. 169-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hofer, Katharina T. ; Kandrács, Ágnes ; Ulbert, I. ; Pál, Ildikó ; Szabó, Csilla ; Héja, László ; Wittner, L. / The hippocampal CA3 region can generate two distinct types of sharp wave-ripple complexes, in vitro. In: Hippocampus. 2015 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 169-186.
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