The genetics of hepatitis C virus underlie its ability to escape humoral immunity

Jay K. Kolls, G. Szabó

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of chronic liver disease, and efforts to develop therapeutic vaccine strategies have been limited by immune escape due to HCV variants that are resistant to current vaccines or HCV variants that rapidly acquire new resistance-conferring mutations. Recently, the crystal structure of the viral envelope protein E2 region was resolved as well as how E2 docks to the host CD81 protein; therefore, antibodies that block this interaction should prevent viral entry into host cells. In this issue of the JCI, Bailey and colleagues show that immune escape of HCV can occur by naturally occurring polymorphisms in E2 that are distinct from those at mapped sites of antibody binding. These data reveal alternative mechanisms of resistance that need to be considered in both natural viral escape as well as in rationale vaccine design against HCV.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-98
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume125
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2 2015

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Humoral Immunity
Hepacivirus
Vaccines
Antibody Binding Sites
Viral Envelope Proteins
Liver Diseases
Chronic Disease
Mutation
Antibodies
Proteins
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The genetics of hepatitis C virus underlie its ability to escape humoral immunity. / Kolls, Jay K.; Szabó, G.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 125, No. 1, 02.01.2015, p. 97-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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