The function of heat-shock proteins in stress tolerance.

Aniko Venetianer, M. Pirity, Anna Hever-Szabo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We earlier demonstrated that hsp68 is deficiently induced upon stress in the glucocorticoid-resistant, dedifferentiated Reuber rat hepatoma clone 2 cells, but is strongly activated in the differentiated, glucocorticoid-sensitive Faza 967 cells from which clone 2 was derived. We used the two cell types to address the questions whether hsp68 is specifically involved in the development of thermotolerance and/or thermoresistance or drug resistance. Our experiments show that clone 2 cells were not protected from the killing effect of heat by pretreatment with sodium arsenite, whereas Faza 967 cells were. These results strongly suggest a role of hsp68 in the development of thermotolerance in hepatoma cells. Stable heat-resistant variants of clone 2 cells were also isolated, where an increased basal expression of several hsps was observed together with the (at least partial) restoration of the heat-inducibility of hsp68. These results suggest that several hsps are needed to protect the critical biological processes at high temperature. The heat-resistant hepatoma cells also became resistant to several anticancer drugs. The multidrug resistance of the hepatoma variants correlates with the overexpression of the plasma membrane P-glycoprotein. Our results showing that severely stressed hepatoma cells overexpressed the mdr gene(s) raise the possibility that the P-gp may participate in protection against environmental stress such as heat.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)605-616
Number of pages12
JournalCell Biology International
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1994

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Heat-Shock Proteins
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Hot Temperature
Clone Cells
Glucocorticoids
Biological Phenomena
Conservation of Natural Resources
Multiple Drug Resistance
P-Glycoprotein
Drug Resistance
Cell Membrane
Temperature
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Genes
Thermotolerance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

The function of heat-shock proteins in stress tolerance. / Venetianer, Aniko; Pirity, M.; Hever-Szabo, Anna.

In: Cell Biology International, Vol. 18, No. 6, 06.1994, p. 605-616.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Venetianer, Aniko ; Pirity, M. ; Hever-Szabo, Anna. / The function of heat-shock proteins in stress tolerance. In: Cell Biology International. 1994 ; Vol. 18, No. 6. pp. 605-616.
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