The endoribonucleolytic N-terminal half of Escherichia coli RNase E is evolutionarily conserved in Synechocystis sp. and other bacteria but not the C-terminal half, which is sufficient for degradosome assembly

V. R. Kaberdin, A. Miczák, J. S. Jakobsen, S. Lin-Chao, K. J. McDowall, A. Von Gabain

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Abstract

Escherichia coli RNase E, an essential single-stranded specific endoribonuclease, is required for both ribosomal RNA processing and the rapid degradation of mRNA. The availability of the complete sequences of a number of bacterial genomes prompted us to assess the evolutionarily conservation of bacterial RNase E. We show here that the sequence of the N-terminal endoribonucleolytic domain of RNase E is evolutionarily conserved in Synechocystis sp. and other bacteria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Synechocystis sp. homologue binds RNase E substrates and cleaves them at the same position as the E. coli enzyme. Taken together these results suggest that RNase E-mediated mechanisms of RNA decay are not confined to E. coli and its close relatives. We also show that the C-terminal half of E. coli RNase E iS both sufficient and necessary for its physical interaction with the 3'-5' exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase, the RhlB helicase, and the glycolytic enzyme enolase, which are components of a 'degradosome' complex. Interestingly, however, the sequence of the C-terminal half of E. coli RNase E is not highly conserved evolutionarily, suggesting diversity of RNase E interactions with other RNA decay components in different organisms. This notion is supported by our finding that the Synechocystis sp. RNase E homologue does not function as a platform for assembly of E. coli degradosome components.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11637-11642
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume95
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 29 1998

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Synechocystis
Escherichia coli
Bacteria
RNA Stability
Polyribonucleotide Nucleotidyltransferase
Bacterial Genomes
ribonuclease E
degradosome
Ribosomal RNA
Phosphopyruvate Hydratase
Enzymes

Keywords

  • mRNA degradation
  • RNA degradosome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

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title = "The endoribonucleolytic N-terminal half of Escherichia coli RNase E is evolutionarily conserved in Synechocystis sp. and other bacteria but not the C-terminal half, which is sufficient for degradosome assembly",
abstract = "Escherichia coli RNase E, an essential single-stranded specific endoribonuclease, is required for both ribosomal RNA processing and the rapid degradation of mRNA. The availability of the complete sequences of a number of bacterial genomes prompted us to assess the evolutionarily conservation of bacterial RNase E. We show here that the sequence of the N-terminal endoribonucleolytic domain of RNase E is evolutionarily conserved in Synechocystis sp. and other bacteria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Synechocystis sp. homologue binds RNase E substrates and cleaves them at the same position as the E. coli enzyme. Taken together these results suggest that RNase E-mediated mechanisms of RNA decay are not confined to E. coli and its close relatives. We also show that the C-terminal half of E. coli RNase E iS both sufficient and necessary for its physical interaction with the 3'-5' exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase, the RhlB helicase, and the glycolytic enzyme enolase, which are components of a 'degradosome' complex. Interestingly, however, the sequence of the C-terminal half of E. coli RNase E is not highly conserved evolutionarily, suggesting diversity of RNase E interactions with other RNA decay components in different organisms. This notion is supported by our finding that the Synechocystis sp. RNase E homologue does not function as a platform for assembly of E. coli degradosome components.",
keywords = "mRNA degradation, RNA degradosome",
author = "Kaberdin, {V. R.} and A. Micz{\'a}k and Jakobsen, {J. S.} and S. Lin-Chao and McDowall, {K. J.} and {Von Gabain}, A.",
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T1 - The endoribonucleolytic N-terminal half of Escherichia coli RNase E is evolutionarily conserved in Synechocystis sp. and other bacteria but not the C-terminal half, which is sufficient for degradosome assembly

AU - Kaberdin, V. R.

AU - Miczák, A.

AU - Jakobsen, J. S.

AU - Lin-Chao, S.

AU - McDowall, K. J.

AU - Von Gabain, A.

PY - 1998/9/29

Y1 - 1998/9/29

N2 - Escherichia coli RNase E, an essential single-stranded specific endoribonuclease, is required for both ribosomal RNA processing and the rapid degradation of mRNA. The availability of the complete sequences of a number of bacterial genomes prompted us to assess the evolutionarily conservation of bacterial RNase E. We show here that the sequence of the N-terminal endoribonucleolytic domain of RNase E is evolutionarily conserved in Synechocystis sp. and other bacteria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Synechocystis sp. homologue binds RNase E substrates and cleaves them at the same position as the E. coli enzyme. Taken together these results suggest that RNase E-mediated mechanisms of RNA decay are not confined to E. coli and its close relatives. We also show that the C-terminal half of E. coli RNase E iS both sufficient and necessary for its physical interaction with the 3'-5' exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase, the RhlB helicase, and the glycolytic enzyme enolase, which are components of a 'degradosome' complex. Interestingly, however, the sequence of the C-terminal half of E. coli RNase E is not highly conserved evolutionarily, suggesting diversity of RNase E interactions with other RNA decay components in different organisms. This notion is supported by our finding that the Synechocystis sp. RNase E homologue does not function as a platform for assembly of E. coli degradosome components.

AB - Escherichia coli RNase E, an essential single-stranded specific endoribonuclease, is required for both ribosomal RNA processing and the rapid degradation of mRNA. The availability of the complete sequences of a number of bacterial genomes prompted us to assess the evolutionarily conservation of bacterial RNase E. We show here that the sequence of the N-terminal endoribonucleolytic domain of RNase E is evolutionarily conserved in Synechocystis sp. and other bacteria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Synechocystis sp. homologue binds RNase E substrates and cleaves them at the same position as the E. coli enzyme. Taken together these results suggest that RNase E-mediated mechanisms of RNA decay are not confined to E. coli and its close relatives. We also show that the C-terminal half of E. coli RNase E iS both sufficient and necessary for its physical interaction with the 3'-5' exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase, the RhlB helicase, and the glycolytic enzyme enolase, which are components of a 'degradosome' complex. Interestingly, however, the sequence of the C-terminal half of E. coli RNase E is not highly conserved evolutionarily, suggesting diversity of RNase E interactions with other RNA decay components in different organisms. This notion is supported by our finding that the Synechocystis sp. RNase E homologue does not function as a platform for assembly of E. coli degradosome components.

KW - mRNA degradation

KW - RNA degradosome

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